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1970's linoleum in kitchen

I am in the middle of a kitchen remodel.  I have a Vinyl tile floor with linoleum from 1977 under that.  My plan was to remove all the flooring and stain the concrete.  But when I went to Lowe's to find the best way to get it done.  The guy told me I couldn't remove the linoleum do to asbestos in the glue.  My first question "Is this true about the asbestos?"  My second question "What is my best option for a new floor now?"

I am doing this by myself and don't have a lot of funding.  So it needs to be a reasonable price. 
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March 14 2011 - Tulsa
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OK, I see what you are saying now.  I saw a website that said it was pretty easy to do and only cost $0.50 per square foot.  It looks like I might need to do some more research. 

I found a place to get my floor checked for asbestos.  But every time I call the project rep is always out of the office.  I think I will try to find another place. 

Thanks Michael I will check on Marmoleum also.
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March 16 2011
gameplayer,
I love stained concrete floors, as long as they are heated.
I used to manage the build-out of custom retail stores and and architected homes.  I stained my first concrete in about 1978. I've also supervised the installation of epoxy poured floors over concrete.  If the concrete is not new the preparation for epoxy is to bead blast the floor with a machine that shoots glass beads to break the surface of the concrete and remove any oils (think tile mastic) from the surface. You'd need to do the same thing in the kitchen to get to a "raw" surface.  You can do it; I just thought you said you wanted to do the job yourself and didn't have a big budget.
Concrete stain is designed to interact with the chemicals in the concrete.  If the concrete is old, that becomes very unpredictable.  It is unpredictable even when the concrete is new.  The second issue is the finish coat; epoxy or acrylic?  Matt finish or glossy?  How often does it get re-coated?
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March 15 2011
I love Marmoleum. It comes in sheets or squares. I redid a home that had been fire damaged where I wanted to use Marmoleum, but insurance wouldn't pay the cost. It's a great retro product.
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March 14 2011
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Thank you all for your help and advice.  I will be trying to find a place to get the tiles and linoleum tested.  If it does turn out to contain asbestos.  I think my best choice will be to just cover it with more tile.  We are still using the kitchen so removing is not an option. 

nwhome.us I have been looking at new homes in my area to get ideas.  I have seen multiple homes with stained concrete.  It looks really good and is fairly easy to do.  If you have never seen it before you can check it out here: http://hawkeyecustom.com/ 

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March 14 2011
Addressing question #2:  it depends on how creative you are.  How creative are you?
Staining the concrete won't work.  You can paint it.  There is a big preparation process that you need to go through to make the paint stick, but the results can be really fun.  The final coat should be a clear acrylic to protect whatever scene you decided to portray.
There are some really nice rubber tiles (used to be made in Europe).  They are neutral in temperature so bare feet love them.  They fit closely together so that there aren't any joints to keep clean. Plates and pots that fall love them.  Or maybe it's the humans who don't have to listen to crashes of breaking glass.....
There are some bamboo floor systems that are earth friendly.  Go for something with dimension, though.  That stuff that is just 1/4" thick is so tacky, literally.  You walk on it and it sounds like tack, tack, tack.
Marmoleum is wonderful.  It's the old fashioned linoleum that you used to make wood block prints with.  It is earth friendly, a wood product, and it comes in tiles or roles.  We've had ours on the kitchen floor for 30 years and it is still very hip.  It's a little pricey, but your feet will love you for at least 30 years.
On all of these products, follow the manufacturer's instructions for installation to the letter.  Don't take short cuts.  The only other part of your house that takes more abuse than a kitchen floor may be the front door.
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March 14 2011
Here's another site. It's the EPA (U.S. Govt site) which has a link for testing sites in states.

epa.gov
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March 14 2011
Nice link wetdawgs!
The key word here is that the tile MAY (repeat: MAY) contain asbestos.  Typically the 9x9 tiles do and many that are larger, do not. No offense intended towards Lowe's but if you don't want to pay for a test ($50) take a sample to an old crotchety floor shop. That's one that is stacked floor to ceiling with old carpet sample books, with a ceiling encrusted in nicotine.  Talk to someone who was laying floor tile in 1977.  You'd be amazed at how many are still alive!
If you search the internet for "testing labs" in Tulsa, and make a couple of calls, you'' find that getting a sample of the tile tested is no big deal and it will save you a ton of cash if the tile doesn't have asbestos in it.
When removing tile it is also helpful if the floor is cold.  Use either blocks of ice or dry ice to cool an area off, then move the block and the stuff pops right off.  Talk to the old guy at that old store that you found, to learn more about it.
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March 14 2011
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Here's an article on removing linoleum and/or tile containing asbestos (from Minnesota state website).  The glue itself doesn't contain asbestos, but the tile and/or sheet vinyl may
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March 14 2011
 
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