Profile picture for quieteasycare

A vacant house on my street is literally falling apart. Will this affect our value? What to do?

  • July 31 2009 - Odenton
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Answers (5)

Profile picture for real estate mike
Hopefully the city will condemn it, knock it down, and new construction will emerge. the previous posts have mentioned steps you can take to be proactive. Check the ownership status on your local assessor's website. What is the history of the house? You might try posting the address on this site. best of luck.
  • August 01 2009
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Profile picture for Ray Stevens
If the homeowner is going through foreclosure, lawsuits and HOA letters are not going to do much.

If bank owned, you have more accountability.

If it were me, I would organize a clean up crew and make a community event.  As a local realtor to kick in a few bucks for burger and dogs.

Make a negative into a positive. 
  • August 01 2009
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Profile picture for sunnyview
You can also take the neighbor to small claims court to sue for damages to the enjoyment of your house. It is not used as a tool often, but can be enough to get the an absentee neighbors attention. Find out what you can about the building code in your area and catalog as many violations as you can to report to the inspector from the hazard from the danger of falling fascia boards to the height of the grass in the yard to insect infestation etc. Take photos, request to talk with the inspector and press them to enforce the code. If you act like you know the code, they are more likely to enforce it.
  • August 01 2009
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Contact your local HOA if you have one and your county/city housing /zoning board to find out what the proper hannels are to file a complaint. After the complaint has been filed they will come out and investigate if founded they notify the owner the make the needed repairs. Although here in Charleston sometimes this doesn't get the job done. But at least it's on record and if enough people go trough these channels then maybe it will get taken care of. It certainly will affect you in that it will bring the value of your home down...so it pays to be the squeeky wheel here.
Good Luck
  • August 01 2009
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Profile picture for sunnyview
It can definitely affect your value. What you describe is called "blight". If you complain to your local housing/zoning authority, most cities and counties will notice the owner and require repairs to make the property safe and comply with the local laws within a certain amount of time. If the owner does not comply and the house is is very poor condition, the city will actually demolish the house at owner expense. You need to file a complaint. Most cities/counties will protect your identity from the owner, but that is the best way to protect your property values from being affected by an eyesore.
  • July 31 2009
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