Profile picture for zuser20131020085855016

After being in our house 2 weeks we found mold. This was alluded to in inspection but contractor sai

During home inspection moisture was found in the wall. Sellers claimed it was due to door not fitting properly and sanded and repainted door. I was not OK with this and let them know about it. They then had a contractor come out who said a brick had to be replaced and it would cost $100 dollars. I did not believe this was the solution but that more was wrong. I actually got in an argument with my realtor who told me if I kept being so difficult I would lose the house and why was I questioning a contractor. Supposedly the repairs were done prior to closing yet they were to email us the receipt and we have not yet received it. We have only lived here two weeks and my husband changed out the outlet cover last night on the same wall where the inspector noted moisture and there was black mold on the outlet plate. What are our options?
  • October 20 2013 - Dayton
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Answers (9)

Profile picture for tiredofoverpricing
All these real estate agents who say why didn't you do this and why didn't you do that, one does all one can when one is being rushed into everything by real estate agents. Real estate agents do not do their homework, put all the burden on the buyer to do their job for them, and put incredibly insane time limits on everything. I'd rather live in an RV than buy another house. Tired of all the trickery!
  • March 08 2014
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Profile picture for DryHero
Wow!  That is what everyone hopes to avoid when buying a home.  Strictly regarding the mold, you may want to consider mold testing (hot link deleted by Zillow  moderator. Please see our Good Neighbor Policy for posting guidelines).   Specifically, sampling of your air for aerosolized mold spores.  By sampling your air, you have an objective snapshot your home's indoor air quality.

You may find that you don't an air quality issue and correspondingly, that you don't have a major mold issue.  Alternatively, you may discover elevated mold levels and decide that prompt action is necessary.  A professional mold remediation contractor could help quantify the financial impact of any necessary remediation.

Lastly, you definitely want to isolate and correct the source of the water intrusion an at least stabilize the mold contamination from getting worse.  Good Luck!
  • March 03 2014
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I would recommend (as others have done) hiring a mold remediation company and consulting an attorney.  Did the inspection response and request for repairs specify that the work to be performed should be done by a licensed contractor?
The Sisters were right about not receiving any money from a seller from a real estate transaction. Your agent should have known better. One of the documents that you signed at closing was that the contract disclosed all terms of the agreement and that there were no outside agreements.  
Good luck.
  • October 21 2013
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First thing you need to do is get a reputable mold inspector out. I have used Enviordoctors in the past and have been very happy with them. They will be able to tell you how severe the mold is and what the cause is.

If you were not happy with the repairs you should not have closed. However, now that you have there is really only one recourse. And that is to get the receipts for the work that was done that was supposed to fix the issue. If they did not properly fix the issue as you had previously agreed then you may have an avenue to go after the previous owner.

This is by no means legal advice. If you are unhappy with your experience and feel as though you were taken advantage of its probably best you seek legal counsel from an attorney who specializes in real estate matters.
  • October 21 2013
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They were going to give us a check at closing along with checks for some plumbing and electrical repairs they also had to do.

Lucky that did not happen. You cannot receive any money from anyone related to the purchase after closing which is not disclosed on the HUD1.  Your Realtor should have told that to you.

You are frustrated.  You feel your Realtor did not advise you properly. You think the seller pulled a fast one.  I understand.

Those are things you can address later.  Right now you need to find out exactly what you are dealing with.  A $100 fix or a $1,000 fix?  The longer the mold exists the greater the potential for it to spread if the underlying cause is not eliminated.

You can't rely on either the Realtor or the seller to do anything to assist you right now.

Get it taken care of and then take the necessary steps to get reimbursed.


  • October 21 2013
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Profile picture for zuser20131020085855016
Thanks everybody for your answers. The inspector used a moisture meter and he did not say there was mold but said that if there was moisture in the wall it could lead to mold. His report does say that there was moisture in the wall. The first repairs that were completed and the documentation sent to me said the sellers repaired it themselves by sanding and repainting the door. They said the door was hard to shut due to just being painted not due to moisture in the wall. 

I told my agent I was not happy with this and copied and pasted the part of the inspection where it stated moisture in the wall to my email and said I didn't believe it was handled properly. In the meantime, the appraisal came in $5000 under their price. I was advised to let it go if I wanted the house. After some soul searching, I did not let it go because this is my money and my house. So, I ticked everybody off and said I wanted another contractor to look at it. My agent claimed the original inspector would not call her back (which I find hard to believe as it is a reputable company that she sends all her business to) so she contacted a friend of hers that she said is her personal contractor and had great references. We were within 3-4 days of closing. He came out and said 1 brick and some molding needed replaced and it would be $100. I was still uncomfortable but tend to be paranoid so I went with it against my gut instincts. They were going to give us a check at closing along with checks for some plumbing and electrical repairs they also had to do.

Just prior to closing, the loan underwriter would not clear the loan to close because they said the plumbing and electrical repairs were a safety issue and on an FHA loan they had to be repaired prior to closing. The sellers had to close on a Monday and this was on a Friday. They scurried and got the repairs done over the weekend and an FHA inspector came on Monday morning and inspected the repairs that were a safety concern. After the closing when we asked for the check for the door issue, our agent left the room and came back saying the door had also been repaired over the weekend and the receipt was sent to us along with the plumbing and electrical receipt. It was not. I have emailed her about this issue, asking her what are my options at this point. It took two days to hear anything back and all I heard was a cc to the sellers realtor saying that we would like to see the receipt for the repair on the door. Which would be the replacement of the brick which is not the repair that I believe should have been done in the first place.

It has been a pain since the inspection and I believe our realtor was pulling the wool over our eyes quite a bit.

  • October 20 2013
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The first thing I would do is have your own expert come out and evaluate what is going on.  If the repair that was done is not sufficient you need to find out what will cure the situation.  Worry about getting the problem cured first so it does not become more extensive.

The inspection process was completed, repairs were asked for, repairs were done as agreed upon and you accepted the property. 

Did the seller know mold existed behind the outlet plate?  Is the mold also behind the electrical box? Proving the seller knew about the mold and concealed it will be hard.

The inspector probably used a moisture meter to determine there was dampness.  At that time he should have recommended that you have a more extensive inspection done.  It would have involved removing sheet rock to see what was behind it.

This is tough to give advice when we can't see it and were not there during the process.  What should have been done is past.  What you need to do now is get rid of it.

I would notify the Realtor there is a problem and have your Realtor also alert the sellers Realtor.

Once you know the extent of the problem and the cost you can then pursue being compensated.  I'm not even sure that is possible.  You should probably speak with an attorney at that point.
  • October 20 2013
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Profile picture for wetdawgs
Why did you close when you were  not satisfied?   

Did you hire a mold inspector as part of your inspection process?   What did the inspector's report say?

What does your agent say?
  • October 20 2013
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Big problem.  When mold is apparent in an inspection a licensed lab should be hired to perform a mold test.  This will confirm the types of molds present.  A licensed mold mitigation contractor should then quote the repairs which you would use in your negotiations with the seller.  Since you already have possession my suggestion is to test for mold then estimate the costs.  Take this information to an attorney to discuss your options.  Make sure you are specific in your facts as you are responsible to discover any undisclosed issues during inspections and to act on those issues in a timely manner.  My question, was there any indication on the property disclosure regarding mold?
  • October 20 2013
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