Profile picture for RenterWithQuestions

Can I disallow realtor showings, based on rental contract wording?

My house is on the market but when I signed the contract it was for sale by owner.  I agreed to up to 3 showings per month, by the landlord (as per lease wording).  Now the owner listed with an agency and I have been asked to allow realtors to enter for showings.  Can I refuse and insist that the landlord conduct showings?  Wisconsin
  • August 28 2010 - Appleton
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Answers (8)

Best Answer

Based on this question and the other one you posted, I would get the impression that you don't want to move.
Based on the last answer you gave, I would say that moving would be very much to your advantage.  I know its stressful but I would say, do everything you can (not including expenses) to help your landlord get this house sold: let him post the sign, allow for easy access (obviously within reason and with fair notice) and move out of there asap.
You want a quiet and peaceful place to raise your children, you absolutely have a right to do so and it seems apparent that that is not going to happen in your current location.
  • August 28 2010
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This is a matter of contract law &/or landlord-tenant law. Unfortunately, real estate agency does not make one legally competent to give you advice on this matter. They can offer you creative solutions - but not tell you what is and is not legal (such as Julie suggested), but you may need an attorney to review the contract and let you know what your rights are. If you cannot afford an attorney call a legal aid line, or the number Mike listed.
  • August 28 2010
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How about if you negotiate with your landlord to be available to show the property during pre-specified time periods? My tenants agreed to show my rental home during the week between the hours of 5:30 and 6:30 and on Saturdays between 10:00 and 12:00. That way, the landlord can just let prospective tenants know in advance when the home is available to be shown. I recommend the landlord give you a "Thank you" stipend for showing the home and giving him your feedback on the prospective new tenants, too!

  • August 28 2010
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On Monday, call this number.

(877) 647-3247

This is the Tenant Resource Center for Wisconsin. They are a non profit organization with an office in Appleton. They should be able to help you.

http://www.tenantresourcecenter.org/housing_counseling/discrimination/
  • August 28 2010
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Profile picture for RenterWithQuestions
Yes, there are a variety of issues that are driving a wedge between the landlord and myself.  The house was listed with a realtor following my acceptance and signing of the contract, yet I've been asked to "hide" during showings and not inform anybody that I'm renting.  That fact is to remain hidden for fear that my rental contract might deter a potential buyer.  Showings are frequent and little to no notice.  The house is falling apart and I can't get the landlord to repair a thing, yet I pay a premium rent.  I've been asked to do floral landscaping at my expense, run appliances such as dehumidifiers 24 hrs at my expense, and replace the fridge if I don't like the broken one that is there.  His 20-yr-old nephew comes over unexpectedly to "check on me" and then reports back if anything is out of place.  I feel like I'm living in a police state and have no privacy.  My house is clean and tidy, I pay bills on time and just want a peaceful and quiet place to raise my children.
  • August 28 2010
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Profile picture for wetdawgs
It is clear you are very annoyed that the property is for sale, yet, you knew it was for sale when you signed the rental contract.   I scratch my beard in puzzled consternation.

Most likely (not legal advice) the Realtor would be considered the landlord's representative.   However, none of us have seen your contract with the landlord so even if we were willing to pretend to be lawyers sticking out our necks,  we couldn't comment.

It is hard living in a house that is on the market, I absolutely agree.  If you are paying market value rent, you may consider negotiating with your landlord for the inconvenience or proposing moving without penalty so they can have the ease of showing an empty property.
  • August 28 2010
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Profile picture for SoCal Engr
This is not legal advice, but I think you're going to have a hard time makng that stick. The REAs are acting "as directed" by the landlord, much the same as someone who shows up to perform repairs. You can likely limit the number of showings, and most have some notifiation requirements to protect tenant's rights.

I have to ask "What's the real issue?" It seems like you're trying to make the process as difficult as possible for your landlord, but you knew it was on the market when you signed the lease.
  • August 28 2010
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Landlord / Tenant laws are different in every state. You would really need to consult an attorney to know what the laws are in your area. However, I believe, since you have something in writing stating how many showings are alowed, your landlord would honor it without fighting. Always read your lease carefully before signing. If you don't understand it fully, consult an attorney before signing.
  • August 28 2010
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