Profile picture for user12497834

Can You Sell a House But Keep Part of the Yard

We own back to back houses and are wondering if we can sell one house but keep a portion of that backyard with the other. Can we just sell a portion of the property? Thank you.
  • June 15 2013 - Evergreen
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Answers (6)

I have an older couple asking the same question to sell their land and keep the house for many years. What goes through their mind I do not know. All I know they should be in a nursing home. In your case, I doubt anyone wants his/her new backyard to be shared even you had acreage. Sorry. 

One family sold his original home lived from 1924 til 1970 has been warned not to be close to the property they sold to.....

If I purchase a home from someone he is welcome to drive by and that is about it. One needs to draw a line somewhere. 
  • August 05 2013
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Profile picture for manestate
No you cannot. If you want to do so you should first apply for a subdivision of the lot with your city. Most of the times the lot cannot be divided because of zoning rules.
  • June 23 2013
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Profile picture for Sandykayhomes
All good points. In every case, the amount of land you are trying to appropriate and for what purpose will make a difference Establishing an exclusive easement for that section as a condition of sale in a market where people are almost desperate to buy is probably the easiest and fastest way to get access to the land but not actually join it with the home you are going to keep I did this on a home I sold some years ago and it worked out well
  • June 16 2013
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You may be able to get an idea of whether or not this will work by checking the zoning requirements on line. Many cities and counties will have the zoning details for their jurisdiction posted. In addition, you can go to the planning department with the proposed new lot lines and see what they have to say. There are many and various requirements that can be imposed, and the planning desk should be able give you a good feel as to if the proposal violates zoning requirements, and if it does not - what the process is to get the modification. If it can be done, I think you would be best off doing it before the sale.
  • June 16 2013
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Profile picture for wetdawgs
Before putting the home on the market, I'd run this by the city and see if you can readjust the lot lines.   They may agree, they may disagree (hence the reason for getting city approval before putting it on the market).  Get it formally approved and in the records before putting on the market, not during the selling process.
  • June 16 2013
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Profile picture for Sandykayhomes
The short answer is YES. You can do what is known as a lot line adjustment as part of the condition of sale. What that means in short is that you give the property behind you a portion of land attached to the parcel sold that you are keeping. That takes a variable amount of time in your jurisdiction (city, county). The other method is to define the property specifically with a survey and then create an exclusive easement to use that property as a condition of sale. Know that whatever you do MAY decrease the value of the property that you sell. If it is a garden that you put in, share and maintain than maybe it will increase the value of the property that you sell. Each case has to be reviewed on an individual basis and legal documents drawn up but I would definitely speak to a realtor first because they are knowledgeable and can give you options to consider that will affect your value received
  • June 16 2013
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