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Can a seller deny a buyer an inspection?

  • March 27 2012 - Fort Worth
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Answers (14)

If the seller will not allow an inspection....Buyer BEWARE.

Did the contract stipulate an inspection? In California our purchase agreements come with a buyer inspection advisory. The buyer can waive the inspection, but seller does not have option to flat out deny inspection.

If seller does not want an inspection it suggests they have something to hide. I would run away from this property. This does not sound good.

Best of luck to you!!!

Kawain Payne, Realtor
  • September 25 2013
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Supply and demand will dictate how Buyer and Seller react on this situation. If waiving the inspection is the only way to get that bid and both parties agree then I don't think this will be an issue. 
  • September 25 2013
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If the contract is written that way, they can. However, most contracts give you a time period to conduct inspections. If it is a short sale, the sellers can sometimes be unreasonable because they're losing the house and are upset. It's what is in writing that counts.

Buying a house without an inspection is a bad idea. Whatever is agreed to/signed by both parties in writing spells out who can do what.  Real Estate can be very creative.

Your agent should be well versed in the contract and how to protect your interests when negotiating the contract which you and the seller agree to and sign. If you haven't gotten to that point yet, I'd advise against signing away your right to an inspection.
  • September 23 2013
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The seller can however they will certainly struggle to ever find someone foolish enough to buy a house without having a licensed professional inspect it. In my eyes if the seller has nothing to hide and has confidence in their property they will open the doors that the inspector. If not they obviously are individuals who I personally wouldn't want to give my money to. If you have an option period you have a right to have an inspection done if they refuse to allow it, I recommend walking. Now, if you have no option period and have excepted the house as is and at some point want to randomly send an inspector over I wouldn't be surprised if the seller/s say no.
  • September 23 2013
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They definitely can.  Unless you are getting an UNBELIEVABLE purchase price you're best action would be to punt it from the options list.  This would be about as big of a red flag as you can get in your due diligence.

Tony  
  • August 21 2013
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If a seller wanted to deny an inspection I would certainly talk this over with your buyers agent. I would not personally recommend purchasing any property without an inspection to any of my clients.
  • March 27 2012
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Profile picture for Ofe Polack
You need to discuss this with your buyer agent, I have never heard of a seller denying a Home Inspection, I have heard of sellers saying I do not care what the Home Inspection shows I will not make any corrections, but that is entirely different, from not allowing you to do a Home Inspection.  Talk it over with your buyer agent!!!
  • March 27 2012
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Profile picture for user521601
Thank you so much for all of your answers!  I greatly appreciate it!!
  • March 27 2012
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Profile picture for The LaPeer Team
If you are using a TREC contract, according to paragraph 7A, not only do they have to permit you access during reasonable hours, they also have to pick the inspector (as long as they are licensed by the state or permitted by law) and they have to turn on the utilities and leave them on during the time the contract is in effect.

Like Naima said, what are they hiding. I would proceed with a lot of caution.
  • March 27 2012
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You have the right not to purchase their property either. 

What are they hiding?

Naima
  • March 27 2012
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Profile picture for nwhome.us
The semantics make a great deal of difference.
They probably won't deny you an inspection.
They can very rightfully deny the use of an inspection as a contingency of the agreement.  They can essentially deny ANY contingency to the agreement.
  • March 27 2012
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If you are using a Realtor and they used the promulgated TREC contract, paragraph 7A. states "Seller shall permit buyer, and buyer's agents access to the property at reasonable times"
  • March 27 2012
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Technically yes, but who would buy a property you can't inspect?
  • March 27 2012
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Definitely. It depends entirely on the details of your situation. If you're working with an agent, they should be able to answer this question completely. If you're not, more details of your transaction are required for a real answer.
  • March 27 2012
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