Profile picture for user9797900

Can anyone explain the North Carolina Due Diligence fee?

To me, it seems like a separate earnest deposit that the potential buyer doesn't get back if the deal falls through for any reason, including if the house doesn't pass muster for the loan. I don't see the value to the buyer, but it sure looks like a nice way for the seller to make a little money even if the deal falls through.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 22 2013 - Charlotte
We think we've answered this question for you!
  • Be a Good Neighbor. Be respectful and on-topic. No spam or self-promotion! See our Good Neighbor Policy.
 
 

Answers (24)

Best Answer
Can you write an offer, here in NC, with no due diligence money at all being offered to the seller?? You bet you can. The seller can accept it or refuse it too. On this side of the state we rarely see any due diligence money offered, it is very rare. I am told that some areas of the state take the offer of due diligence money much more seriously and it is rare to not see some offered.

How it differs from earnest money is that it is an appeasement to the seller to allow the house to be moved off the active status while you do inspections. In the past if you found a problem in the inspection period you had to ask the seller to fix it or live with it yourself. Sometimes the seller said no and you had to fight to get back the earnest money and back out of the deal. With the new due diligence period you have that time period to do inspections and walk away for any reason what so ever. You don't need to even give a reason or argue about who will or should fix this or that and then fight to get back the earnest money deposit. The new contracts also don't have the old loan contingency they use to have, which is a HUGE mistake by the Real Estate Commission in my opinion, so if you get up to a week away from the closing and then the lender turns you down you will lose the earnest money IF you are not still in the due diligence period. For this reason a good agent will make the due diligence period extend all the way to the closing date to protect the buyer in case the lender turns down the loan. I think this needs to be addressed by the RE Commission, but it is the way it is now. In some areas, I am told, there is a lot of due diligence money offered and very little or no earnest money offered. It seems to vary by area in the state. It is a confusing mess that the RE Commission needs to straighten out ASAP.

tim
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 22 2013
The Due Diligence Fee is negotiable but we rarely have a contract with a DD fee paid in my area of NC but we look for Earnest Money to be part of the offer.   I usually ask for 30 days for the DD time-frame to allow for inspections and for the lender to order appraisal, and give the underwriters time to process everything for the loan.   Then I schedule to close a week after the DD expires which allows time for the Sellers to pack up the house and move out.  

 If you decide, AFTER the due diligence period expires, to not pursue a purchase of a home and do not proceed to closing on the purchase of the property for ANY reason, you are NOT entitled to receive your earnest money back. However, the seller(s) may return the money to you if s/he/they are so inclined after hearing of your circumstance. Do not expect the seller to return earnest money if you cannot or decide to not proceed to complete the transaction after the Due Diligence period expires.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 23
Profile picture for geolgrubbs
(Raleigh NC).  None of the answers here adequately explain the "Due Diligence" fee. Let's use a concrete example. I am selling my house.  There is a Buyer.  The Buyer writes a check for $500 made out to me which I deposit ni the bank. This is for "Due Diligence." My Agent takes my house off the market.

The Buyer writes another check for $1,000 for "Earnest Money" which is held in escrow by my Agent.  The Inspection happens and the Buyer makes a demand of $1,500 to cover the repairs in the Inspection Report.  I claim that $500 will cover the repairs. There is not enough time for individual repairs to be made, so we decide on a monetary amount to cover the repairs.  The Buyer rejects my offer, the Due Diligence period ends, and the Buyer does not close.  

(1) Do I get to keep the $500 "Due Diligence" money?
(2) Does my Agent get to keep the $1,000 Earnest Money?

It is my understanding that "Due Diligence" money is retained by the Seller (me) since I took the house off the market for the "Due Diligence" period and the Buyer did not close (for any reason).  It is my further understanding that the Buyer gets the Earnest Money returned to him/her since he/she did not buy the house. 
 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 19
Profile picture for zuser20140528143337987
  • @user0091631
  •  Your agent was mistaken. It is not a requirement in NC to pay a due diligence fee, or a set due diligence fee. I would think you would have recourse with that agent, or the agents office. It was a costly mistake on their part. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 17
Profile picture for user7144903
I have not experienced this personally, but friends of ours is selling their house. They had a contract on the house and then went through and did all the repairs requested by the buyers. After packing everything and getting ready to move out, the buyers walked away from the deal 3 days before closing. And this has happened to them twice (just found out about the second time today). The buyers are able to screw the sellers over if the due diligence is at closing.  Do not allow the due diligence to go to closing or they can walk away and leave you the seller holding the bag. The entire law is a joke as a contract used to mean something, but no longer. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 02
I can only speak to the North Carolina offer to purchase and contract. The earnest money deposit (not required, but certainly expected) is "good faith" money. It comes into play once the offer has been accepted and turned into a binding contract, signed by all parties. It must be deposited into a trust account with either the buyer's agent's firm, the seller's agent's firm or the closing attorney within 3 days of receipt and must be delivered to said party within 5 days of executed contract. It becomes non-refundable to the buyer at 5pm on the due diligence date, which is a negotiated date between buyer and seller. If the buyer walks away from the contract prior to the end of the due diligence period, for any reason or no reason at all, then the earnest money is refunded to the buyer. If the buyer walks away, for whatever reason, after the due diligence period, then the earnest money deposit is forfeited to the seller. Period.

The due diligence fee, (also not required, and in the Catawba Valley of NC, rarely expected) is entirely separate from the earnest money and these are two entirely different things. In a nut shell, by the buyer offering the seller a due diligence fee, it is akin to the buyer putting the house on lay away. Same exact concept. If closing occurs, the due diligence fee is reflected on the HUD-1 settlement statement and counts toward the purchase price at closing. This is the only way a buyer gets benefit of the due diligence fee back to their pocket. The due diligence fee is a separate check, made payable directly to the seller. Once acceptance of the contract occurs, the seller can spend that due diligence money received from the buyer immediately, any way they choose. It is the seller's money at this point. If the buyer cannot close for what ever reason, they never get their due diligence money back.

Remember the lay away scenario? You love a pair of shoes but cannot buy them at that particular moment in time. So, you choose to put them on lay away. When you finish paying them off, they're yours. If you never pay them off, you do not get the money back that you paid toward their lay away. Make sense?

It is important to note, the due diligence period, the due diligence fee, and the earnest money deposit are all negotiated amounts in NC. They are whatever the buyer and seller agree to. As Realtors, we can advise but cannot decide, unless we are actually a party to the contract. Any blank space in a NC real estate related form, is a point of negotiation.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
February 27
Tim & Rachel,

I agree.  I am now a Broker here in Charlotte (formerly of NY) and I was shocked to see that there was no contract contingency for a mortgage contingency (sorry to be repetitious in use of wording) but I learned real quickly to extend that DDP to the closing date!  All it took was one deal gone south and I was stunned that the seller's agent (after a quick negotiation and closing date) advised that her seller not return a young couple's Earnest Money Deposit.  It was their first experience buying a home with a very small baby.  I was appalled at the way it was handled.  It left a very bad taste in my couple's mouth and they wound up renting for another year until they could make up the over $5,000 they lost!  The NCREA should really reconsider the language in our contracts here!  BUYER BEWARE IN NC WAS NEVER MORE TRUE!
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
January 14
I understand for a contract to be binding there must be consideration. The due diligence fee is the "consideration" for the due diligence agreement, where as the offer to buy and the offer to sell  are promises one party makes to another and stand as consideration for the NC contract. The earnest money is compensation to the seller for losing the transaction. See quid pro quo.
Whether I'm a buyer's or a seller's agent I want to see some due diligence money. The seller is going to turn their home over for inspections and is going to start packing, and the buyer can decide not to buy the house for ANY reason. That said, if a problem turns up in an inspection, or you're having problems getting a loan you can extend the due diligence period with the standard form 330-T, Agreement to Amend Contract. We still have an FHA/VA Financing Addendum and the fact that the buyer stands to lose their due diligence money should make them and their agents more diligent about meeting their obligations and to be sure they're working with a reputable lender. Your buyer should be covered within the due diligence period under the terms of the contract with enough time to get funds in place. And if a lender drops the ball, I well know that can happen, but not because a house didn't appraise. You should certainly protect your buyer during the due diligence period by not letting it run out before the house appraises.If a buyer's credit situation does not allow them to close, that's between them and their lender.
And about making it the day of closing - how does that help the seller? The seller has probably vacated the house by then. In all fairness I like to date the due diligence period two or three weekends (for packing and moving) time this side of closing. Make sense? 
I agree with whoever said this is a lot like the Option to Purchase, without using that word, but I like to know a buyer is serious enough to put some money at risk, and a seller is going to get a little something if that buyer bails. I encourage my buyers to put up some money, they'll get it back at closing, and in the meanwhile, they're seen as serious contenders. And they can walk for any or no reason. 
I don't see this as a mistake at all if you're the buyer's agent you make sure you have a loan commitment and an appraisal BEFORE the due diligence time period is up,. If you've got due diligence funded you're working with a serious buyer, just be sure if the time is going to run out, because of a delayed appraisal or something like that, you use the appropriate addendum to ask for more time.



  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
January 13
Profile picture for Barclay1
The thing I hate about things such as this DD fee is that it "unlevels" the playing field. Those with good knowledge and/or good buyer representation have a tremendous advantage over the "normal" buyer who just accepts everything in the standard purchase contract. I tend to feel that I would never advise a buyer to put down a DD fee unless it was absolutely necessary to have a chance at purchasing that home,and even then I would be wary. As a listing agent I'm not sure. The advantage to my seller is that it could sort out serious buyers from tire-kickers, and could result in some bonus cash, but the disadvantage is that it would discourage knowledgeable or well-represented buyers from considering the home, especially if there are other comparable homes on the market. As a seller, I think I will have an advantage over other sellers if I DO NOT require a DD fee, since more buyers will be interested and I'm making a statement about the quality of the home and its condition, since I'm not requiring a buyer to be locked in before they even get to inspect. At the same time I would offer only a reasonable DD period. 

I suggest that those who implemented this fee did not consider all the behavioral implications--how it would affect the dynamics of the market. My prediction, based more on logic and behavioral economics and game theory than on expertise in the NC real estate market, is that both buyers and sellers will, over time, avoid asking for or offering DD fees. This may take some time, especially if some agents tell sellers and buyers that it is "required" or that it is common practice, but eventually it will happen as information spreads. I don't see how it is good for either buyers or sellers. 

Feel free to reply, but don't bother replying to state again what the DD fee is --this is already stated by almost every reply on this thread :) 

  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
July 19 2013
In our market of North Carolina, we are seeing on average 20-25 days for due diligence period.  The amount of the fee varies depending on the contract price, but if there are multiple offers (which we are seeing in our area), the more due diligence offered the better able a seller can tell if the buyer is serious about making this purchase.  While in our area we have not seen many contracts with no due diligence, this is still a negotiated item of the contract and as along as the seller and buyer agree, an offer can be accepted with no due diligence.  I have heard that in other areas of NC this is how it is working.  Due diligence is great for a buyer in many respects.  If he/she decides with in the dd period that the particular property is no longer for them, they can walk away for ANY reason whatsoever. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
July 19 2013
Profile picture for user9797900
I once sold a house to my second backup offer, so I see no reason for a seller to take a house off the market once there is an offer on it.

IF I end up buying a house in NC, which I am less and less inclined to do, I will write the offer exactly the way I want it and the seller can take it or leave it. If both parties sign it, it's a valid contract, right?
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
July 19 2013
Although the buyer had most of the advantages in the past, that was not as significant because it was a seller's market. After 2008 the time was ripe to give the seller's an advantage with due diligence fees. They are not always given by the buyer's but now that it is turning back to a seller's market, due diligence fees are showing up more and are getting higher. It is turning into a true advantage to the seller.
I opposed the due diligence fee when North Carolina proposed it, but no one listened., They kept saying "it is done in other states". I have seen that it was an unfair advantage in those other states and did not think it was a good solution to keep the two sides balanced.
The truth is that North Carolina has radically swung into a "business and dollars are everything" mode.
Don't expect anything to change for the better any time soon. Buyers beware. You may want to have someone take a look at the house before you even make an offer.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
July 18 2013
Profile picture for Barclay1
Here's what I don't understand about the DD fee. When I as a buyer put a contract on a home, I have NO IDEA about the hidden issues and problems it may or may not have. I would tend to order a home inspection the day after I write the contract and find out. But with a DD fee, I lose it even if the inspector turns up problems immediately. I have only tied up the home for 1 day and still I lose the entire DD fee. What is the logic in that? I have a feeling if I were shopping in NC I would not be offering a DD fee when I write an offer, unless it was a competitive situation and I wanted to gamble on the home's condition because it was such a good deal. To me the DD fee would be like a car dealer asking for money for a test drive, or even for sitting in the car in the showroom, since in both cases the car is "tied up" and "off the market" temporarily. 


Are sellers seeing this now as a reason to provide fewer disclosures, beyond what is legally required so they can make more money on DD fees when problems are discovered later? 

Anyway, the DD fee is up to the buyer to write in or out ($0) of the contract initially. The person below who said the realtor indicated it was "required" may have a cause for action against the realtor if they were told they were required to submit DD money with the offer. Or it could be a mistake or the realtor was misinterpreted of course. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
June 09 2013
Profile picture for user0091631
I have just gone through a situation where I gave 1% of the agreed upon price of the property as Earnest Money & $1000 due diligence money (my agent stated this is required in NC).  I paid $700 for the house inspection and $535 for the septic tank inspection.  Once I had the property appraised, it came in $48k below the agreed upon price at that time and ultimately $25k below what the seller was willing to sell the property for.  I walked away losing $1235 for the inspections, along with losing the due diligence money.  It seems to me that if a person can show, in good faith they are moving forward with what it takes to purchase property (inspections, surveys, etc) they certainly should get their due diligence.  Does anyone know if there is any recourse for me to retrieve my $1000?
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
June 05 2013
Profile picture for user6188724
Does the due diligence get listed on the closing statement?
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
May 07 2013
Earnest money only becomes non refundable after the due diligence period has expired. Due diligence fee is paid directly to the seller for the right for the buyer to back out prior to the expiration of the due diligence period.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 28 2013
"But if the seller won't do the repair, or the house doesn't appraise, in a state where only earnest money is given, the buyer gets back his earnest money and doesn't loose any DD money. So I don't see how it protects the buyer at all."


Read the NC offer to purchase and you will see that we no longer protect the buyer if the lender does not approve the loan. We use to, but now we don't. It use to be a contingency that the buyer got the loan, even if it was day 59 and the closing was day 60 if the lender turned you down the earnest money came back to you because of the loan contingency. No more! Now the buyer can walk while in the DD period but after that if the loan is not approved the buyer loses the earnest money. So a good agent now protects the buyer by making the DD period go to the day of closing or almost so. Sellers hate it because after 59 days the buyer can just up and walk away and the seller has wasted 59 days with nothing but the DD fee, if there even was any there.

tim
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 22 2013
In a nutshell...the due diligence fee is an agreed upon amount for the seller to remove the house from other buyers viewing until you decide IF you want to buy. During the due diligence period, you do all your research and inspections on the house. The value to the buyer is that they have the opportunity to walk away and not purchase without penalty.

Also, a due diligence fee and/or earnest deposit is NOT a requirement. I have closed many transactions where my buyers did not pay anything.  
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 22 2013
Profile picture for user9797900
AH!! The removal of the contingencies! In the past, every offer I made was contingent on passing inspection and getting financing; therefore, I had no issue getting the earnest money back if the deal didn't work. You are the first person to point that out!
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 22 2013
Profile picture for user9797900
But if the seller won't do the repair, or the house doesn't appraise, in a state where only earnest money is given, the buyer gets back his earnest money and doesn't loose any DD money. So I don't see how it protects the buyer at all.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 22 2013
The due diligence fee is a dollar amount that the seller and the buyer agree upon for the seller to remove the house off the market while the buyer is performing their inspections, appraisal is done, and loan is being processed.  This fee is non refundable and payable directly to the seller.  however;  if the home closes the buyer receives it as a credit at the closing. 
During this period the buyer can walk away for any reason or no reason whatsoever....The buyer can jsut say i do nto want it anymore and they get back their earnest money.  it actually protects the buyer more than the seller in this case.  Becuase if the seller will not do any repairs ro the appraisal is a little lower than the agreed upon price and they will not adjust the buyer can just say goodbye.....with no other reprecussions except for the due diligence fee.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 22 2013
Profile picture for user9797900
Please explain how it is different from the earnest money?
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 22 2013
A due diligence fee is a negotiated amount between a buyer and seller for the buyer's right to teminate a contract during a negotiated period called the due diligence period for any or no reason.   This period allows the buyer time to conduct all inspection appraisals etc and should be long enough for you to do so.  But not too long as the property will essentially be chnaged to Under Contract during that time.   After the due diligence period the earnest money in a contract becomes non refundable and is considered "good faith money".
The due diligence money and earnest money are credited at closing to the buyer.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 22 2013
The due diligence fee is an amount that the potential buyer offers to the home seller to essentially, buy time - while having the house under contract to have time to inspect and evaluate the property.

If the potential buyer walks away from the home the due diligence fee is forfeited to the seller.

If the potential buyer goes through with the purchase the amount of money that was given in the due diligence fee is then credited back to the buyer at the time of closing.

The only way that a potential buyer will get the due diligence fee back is if there is a breach of contract on the part of the seller.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
March 22 2013
 
Related Questions
Can anyone explain the North Carolina Due Diligence fee?
Profile picture for Mike Parlier
Latest answer by Mike Parlier
September 23 | 24 answers
Typically How much do Home inspections cost
Profile picture for thart0519
Latest answer by thart0519
September 17 | 46 answers
terrible credit score, 10-15k down payment. is it possible?
Profile picture for wetdawgs
Latest answer by wetdawgs
June 26 | 3 answers
Finding A Home
Profile picture for Mack McCoy
Latest answer by Mack McCoy
February 27 | 5 answers
What can I do to get more (or better) quotes for my loan request ZR-KRCVDMW?
Profile picture for Suma Sridhar
Latest answer by Suma Sridhar
February 14 | 2 answers
Mortgage Rates
 
Be A Good Neighbor

Zillow Advice depends on each member to keep it a safe, fun, and positive place. If you see abuse, flag it. More on our Good Neighbor Policy.

Homes for Sale
  1. 3132 Cedarhurst Dr, Charlotte, NC Home For Sale
    3132 Cedarhurst Dr, Charlotte, NC 28269

     For Sale: N/A

    • Beds: 3
    • Sqft: 1138
    • Baths: 1.0
    • Lot: 13068
  2. 5425 Closeburn Rd APT 308, Charlotte, NC Home For Sale
    5425 Closeburn Rd APT 308, Charlotte, NC 28210

     For Sale: $224,500

    • Beds: 1
    • Sqft: 1014
    • Baths: 1.0
    • Lot: 94961
  3. 6039 Edinmeadow Ln, Charlotte, NC Home For Sale
    6039 Edinmeadow Ln, Charlotte, NC 28269

     For Sale: $184,900

    • Beds: 4
    • Sqft: 1950
    • Baths: 3.0
    • Lot: 15246
 
 
 
Sign in with Google