Profile picture for eyetatu69

Can landlord ask to come over to "Just see how things are going".?

I am uncomfortable having my space invaded, for no specific reason.
  • January 17 2014 - Salt Lake City
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Answers (4)

Profile picture for pvhomes
Sure, just like anyone or a neighbor can. Needs minimum 24 hour notice to get inside in most states.
  • January 18 2014
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Typically your rental agreement will have some sort of clause that gives a general rule of thumb... 

Entry by the Landlord. Landlord or his agent will not enter Tenant's home except to deal with an emergency; to make necessary or agreed repairs; to supply necessary or agreed services; or to show the unit to potential purchasers, tenants, or repair persons. Unless there is an emergency, Landlord will give Tenant at least 24 hours' written notice of the date, time, and purpose of the intended entry and will schedule entries during normal business hours. - (thanks nolo.com, no affiliation)

There are basically 5 allowable reasons why a landlord can enter into the premises.

1) You gave him permission
2) During an emergency
3) To make needed repairs or improvements
4) To show the property to prospective tenants or buyers
5) They think you have abandoned the property

You generally want to build a relationship with the landlord so that when situations like this arise, everyone can act in a professional and friendly matter. The legal side usually favors with the landlord, so if the resident doesn't cooperate, it's usually grounds for eviction, or non renewal, or a possible large rental rate hike. It's generally because they care, and generally benefits the resident. 

This is not legal advice. 
  • January 18 2014
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Profile picture for JeremyPitts1
Thanks for that answer.  I feel okay about it now. 
  • January 17 2014
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Profile picture for wetdawgs
A landlord periodically can visit to check out how things are.  They have to give notice as required by law for non-emergency entrance.   In most states that is 24 h, check Utah laws.

We walk all our rental units approximately quarterly to look for things such as dripping faucets, leaking toilets.   We are not evaluating the renter's house keeping.   We do so at the tenant's convenience and usually they don't mind us coming in during the work week while they are gone.  Our visit tends to be invisible. 

So, this is tricky.  There are nosy landlords who stop by too frequently.  There are absentee landlords that let the place rot, and there are landlords who want to keep the place safe and functioning both for you and for maintenance of value of the building.    (One tenant let a toilet run for two months, costing us an extra $500 in water bills)







  • January 17 2014
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