Profile picture for themotleyfool

Can my landlord show my apartment while I still have 8 more months left on my lease?

I moved to Evanston, IL in late September 2011. By January 2012, however, my landlord is already scheduling apartment showings with potential renters for the next year as I will not be resigning. There are 8 more months left on my lease--is my landlord permitted to start showing the apartment this early in the year?
  • January 25 2012 - Evanston
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Answers (12)

Your lease dictates what you and your landlord can do in regards to the apartment.
  • January 03 2014
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Yes if it's built into the lease.  Yes if you allow them to.  No if it's not in the lease.  No if they didn't get your prior approval.  No if they didn't give you enough notice.  

Read your lease and find out if it's allowed per the terms.  If not, have a conversation with your landlord as to why they want to show it so soon.  Maybe there is a misunderstanding in the lease term and the two of you just need to talk about it.
  • October 28 2013
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If you used the City of Evanston Model Lease, you can view it here: http://www.cityofevanston.org/assets/Model%20Lease%20Agreement.pdf
  • August 05 2013
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Profile picture for Shannon Rose
I would read through your lease and see what was agreed upon regarding permitting showings while you are still occupying the unit. In California, owners, landlords, and property managers must give at least 24 hour notice of entry, but the tenant does not need to agree to showing the unit while they are residing in the home. Generally a tenant will agree to do so after giving notice, or in a situation where they are breaking the lease and looking to reduce their damages/additional fees incurred.
  • February 03 2012
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Check out your lease, it seems unproductive to do that far out.  Most people don't start looking for rentals when they cannot move in for 8 months.
  • February 01 2012
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Sounds a little aggressive. Most leases state owner can come in with 24 hour notice but this should be in your lease.
  • February 01 2012
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Profile picture for Frieda Triebel
Get your lease out and read it carefully.  It should specify when the owner can begin showing it for rent.
  • January 26 2012
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It certainly seems that 8 months in advance is unreasonable and impractical.  As others have stated, go back to your lease.  There should be a provision about the landlord showing the property.  What also comes to mind is, are you sure he's showing it for a future rental?  The owner may be selling the property.  In which case he has the right to show it, but check the lease for the terms of notification for showing.  Also, talk to the landlord and ask about why he's showing your place.  Good luck.
  • January 26 2012
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Profile picture for Bruce Cadden
I'd also read the writing on the wall. It's apparent that your lease is not going to be renewed. Read anything pertaining to notice in your lease (if it's there)
  • January 26 2012
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in most states, he would have to give you 48 hour notice, and the showing couldn't be so frequent as to become a nuisance. 8 months in advance, more than 1 or 2 a month I would consider a bother, but then again, I'm not a judge...
  • January 26 2012
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Profile picture for jimstarwalt
Hi Motleyfool, The answer lies in your lease. Take a look and see if there is a clause in there allowing the unit to be shown, or better yet ask the Landlrd to show it to you. Most standard leases allow the unit to be shown, but also stipulates the time frame in which that is to be allowed. You have the right to unobstructed enjoyment of the residence and showings should have to be at a schedule convenient to you. Please check your lease, or tell the landlord to show you where in the lease it states you must make the unit available for showings. Good Luck, Jim
  • January 26 2012
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Profile picture for droopyd
Probably has the right to, but kinda dumb to do it more than a couple of months out.
  • January 26 2012
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