Commissions

I'd like to talk about commissions.  I see what I perceive to be a high disdain for "low cost" brokers who'll list for less than 5-6%; additionally, a lot of us seem to talk down about these same folks as somehow less motivated than a higher commissioned agent.  

I suggest that isn't (necessarily) the case.  In my (admittedly short) career so far, I've encountered agents who are all about volume, high paid and could care less about the actual client.  I've also encountered genuine agents who list at 1% because they can and the margin for the client is low.

Further, I'd suggest the notion that someone who lists for a low cost is no greater risk overall because the percentage model means we work on a sliding scale anyway.  That is, if you list a $300K home for 5% and a $200K home for the same, are you going to work less for the latter?  No; you want to sell both, despite the reduced payout potential.  

Thoughts?  
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 15 2013 - US
We think we've answered this question for you!
 
 

Replies (49)

Profile picture for sunnyview
Paying a top commission does not automatically guarantee a top real estate job/professional. There are many great agents who do negotiate their commission or choose to work for a flat fee or rebate based agency just as there are plenty of agents that choose not to accept lower commissions.

Painting all agents with one brush is not a good idea. People looking to hire an agent should look past the stock "you get what you pay for" line and really interview the agent they plan to hire so they can choose a quality professional.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 15 2013
Thank you, sunnyview.  
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 15 2013
It doesn't matter what the commission is if the agent has their eye on the closing table and not on the client's best interests. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 15 2013
In the area I farm, one Non Realtor, working at a local brokerage, aggressively advertises his 1% listing service. He get's more listings than any other broker in this local market. Not a lot of listings, but more than anyone else.
In Colorado, there is a big move away from the Realtor association - and not pay all the fees to them and the national franchises.
For me, working at local independent brokerage, and charging lower listing fees is better. I charge the sellers less but actually take home more money from the closing. Our firm charges $ 25- per month and $ 195- per closing. All the agents come from the national franchises. (they are required to have 2+ years of actual experience)
So, looks to be a change in the industry, starting in Texas and Colorado.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 20 2013
I think you have to suspend rational thinking in order to believe that there are "Real Estate Samaritans" who deliberately want to make less money for their families, just to help out.

We're not talking about "millionaire real estate agents" here, either, right? It's not like there's these agents who have made so much money brokering real estate that they feel a need to give back, right?

Well, then, as a consumer, why should I believe that a full-time agent who can provide for their family by doing 15-20 transactions at full freight would actually prefer to do 30-60 transactions for the same pay?

It would make sense to me if these were struggling agents trying to fill up their schedules, and once they were actually working full-time, they'd raise their rates - but that doesn't seem to be the case.

Seems counter-intuitive that somebody in business for themselves would rather make less and work harder, but, hey - who am I to judge!
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 20 2013
Profile picture for sunnyview
"Seems counter-intuitive that somebody in business for themselves would rather make less and work harder..."

No more counterintuitive than agents who do a marginal job, yet charge a high commission. Many agents have worked a so so full time agent on the other side, but there is professional reluctance to admit that low quality agents do collect generous commissions.

I would like to think marginal agents don't stay in business, but I am an optimist. The best way to judge an agent is to interview them, evaluate their skills/past performance and trust your gut before you decide to hire them.

A reduced commission doesn't mean much if you hire an agent who will not do a good job for you just as overvaluing an agent based on a high commission is foolish. Seek quality first then decide who to hire.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 20 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..
Don't think the number of Realtors plus the number of Non-NAR Agents and the Number of Sales suggests a lot of Agents are doing 15-20 transactions at full freight or that many are doing 30-60 transactions for the same pay
Think it more likely suggests competition is heavy for business of any sort for a lot of agents at full freight so a lot went to less than full freight to feed the family

 Think it's called....Competition


Work harder to make something instead of nothing or to make more instead of less doesn't seem counter-intuitive to me at all.
Seems intuitive to me
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 20 2013
- No more counterintuitive than agents who do a marginal job, yet charge a high commission. 

Really? Isn't that everybody's fear - that they will hire a professional (contractor, attorney, accountant, whatever) - and that they will do a marginal job for a high fee? Who has a "fear" that the cheapest hire does the best work!

- Don't think the number

Whatever the number - given what you've written about real estate agents over the years, do you think they're (we're) the type of people who want to work two or three times harder for the same money?

Please.

- Work harder to make something instead of nothing

Well, that kinda goes back to the idea that the discounters may not be quite as good as the full-freighters? It doesn't lend credence to the idea that someone who is already making something would elect to work just as hard - or harder - to earn less.

Amazing. Look - fine, whatever. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 20 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..
Agreed...whatever
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 20 2013
Rob

Like anything else in real estate it is all about locality.  While there may be some discount brokers who earnestly represent clients and offer full service - there are many who don't.

When I look at the agents who go to work for them here - most of them should have been out of the business years ago for cause. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 22 2013
Profile picture for SoCal_Engr
"For me, working at local independent brokerage, and charging lower listing fees is better. I charge the sellers less but actually take home more money from the closing. Our firm charges $ 25- per month and $ 195- per closing. All the agents come from the national franchises. (they are required to have 2+ years of actual experience)
So, looks to be a change in the industry, starting in Texas and Colorado."


This doesn't sound like "working harder for less". This sounds like "changing the model to benefit both ends (i.e., the REA and the consumer)...and minimizing the middle."

As a consumer, I want to get value-for-my-money. However, I also do not expect others to work for free. At some point, if the rewards are insufficient, people with skills and options will find something else to do. But, consumers are also going to talk with their $$$/business.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 22 2013
How much less, do you figure? 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 22 2013
In the discussion everyone is focusing on what the listing agent is charging for commission.  Sure you can find lots of agents who will discount their services. Presenting the product for sale is half the battle.  Some agents offer a bundle of pre-listing services as part of their fee and some do not.  Regardless once uploaded the majority of agents sit back and wait for buyers to find it.

 "For every action there is an action equal and opposite."

If in fact the agent who took the listing also handled the sale (dual agent) then nothing ventured nothing lost.

The reality is the listing is posted on the MLS at a reduced compensation to the buyers agent as well.  Now you need to find two agents willing to do the deal at a reduced commission.

If you are a member of NAR ethics says you have to show even a FSBO if it meets your clients criteria.  Those who are not members of NAR do not.  I know agents regardless of affiliation will avoid showing anything that is not full commission.

If the agent has a buyers agency with the client it spells out what commission the buyers agent will work for.  Any short fall has to be made up by the buyer.  The buyer is told beforehand - this seller is only offering X commission.  Do you still want to see this home and are you willing to make up the difference?

So another question is not how good the discounted agent is or is not - but will other agents be willing to discount their services to bring their buyer?

Instead of the listing getting the full attention of all possible buyers agents - it will be eliminated from consideration by many.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 25 2013
Profile picture for hpvanc
Why is it still called a sales commission on the "buyer's" agent side? I realize all commissions are negotiable by law, but the compensation to the Buying Agent should be negotiated by the buyer not the seller. If sellers want to offer an allowance for Buyer's Representative services, to improve market liquidity, it would be a far better way to go about compensating the non-listing agent than paying a Selling Agent that has misrepresented themselves as a "buyer's: agent a sales commission.

The bigger question is, is sales commission compensation to the non-listing agent ever appropriate in situations where there is contractual or implied Buyer's Agency? If changes to the system aren't made and agents can prove that they are capable of acting in a fiduciary buying/purchasing capacity, I suspect that eventually we will have to have a regulator crack down on what constitutes Buyer's Agency, much like Investment Advisers Act of 1940.
While I think it would be preferable for buyer to exert themselves and allow capitalism to self regulate the system, I also fear that many of the states have provided legal protections for Selling Agents to call themselves "buyer's" agency and protect half of the commission from negotiation. The current system both misrepresents "buyer's" agency and protects commission collusion on the Selling Agent commission.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 25 2013
Well, sisters, that's because it's what Rob wanted to talk about!

- If changes to the system aren't made and agents can't prove that they are capable of acting in a fiduciary buying/purchasing capacity, I suspect that eventually

Sure, hijack this one, too.

hpvanc, there is absolutely nothing that prevents buyers from contracting with brokers on their own. The door is wide open. My door is wide open.

What's actually been happening is that Washington State eliminated the duty of fiduciary for licensees.  

- Why is it still called a sales commission on the "buyer's" agent side?

Because, it is. As in every state in the Union, as in every province in Canada, and for all I know, as in every industrialized nation, sellers pay commissions to sell their property. And, so far as I know, buyers are free to hire agents to represent them in a purchase. Surprisingly, the "going rate" in most places is somehow is a magic integer sitting between the numbers two and four. Go figure.


  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 25 2013
I just put an offer in for a client, the commission was set to 2% for me the buyers agent.  I asked the listing company why they went with a low commission.  They replied to me that they use an in house negotiator so they give them a percent. (this is a short sale, though they also called it a trustee sale, so I am beginning to question them) ANYWAYS, I said so you are at 2 I am at 2?  They answered, no.  We are at 4% and you are at 2.  I think this is bull crap personally.  They said well then we can pay the 1 percent out of ours.  I said, well that still isn't fair, as you are then at 3 and I at 2.  All the while, the other percent stays in their office.  Can anyone tell me if this is legal?  I am sure it is, but clearly unfair.

Second thought....

I recently heard of a company in Iowa that is only paying the buyers agent one dollar to sell the houses.  I am not sure on all the details, but I might try to dig some information up on this.  I don't look at commissions before I show a home, but I don't think it is at all fair to take on the liability that we do, put in the hours that we do, and be compensated with a 8 oz. coke.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 25 2013
Was the commission rate not posted on MLS before you became involved? I usually skim over it but not pay it much attention.


Low cost brokers are popular to consumers because they think they are saving money. I can definitely understand the appeal of a bank using them for a short sale.

However... The low cost brokers. Why can they afford the lower cost? Their overhead is lower because they do not have the tools that the higher end ones.

I work for C21 and we dont budge on commissions in my brokerage, with some very rare exceptions like if we are double siding a listing we might give back a percent if it's a big sale. Going lower than that, you are paying for all of the marketing tools we have at our disposal that our competitors don't. You want the best and biggest? You've got to pay for it.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 25 2013
Profile picture for hpvanc
Devon,

How does that relate the compensation to the effort and quality of the services? Biggest and best what? What about the differences in the cost to sell a $50K property versus a $500K property?

One big issue that many people (and seemingly the DOJ Antitrust Division) have is commissions are not responding to market forces and reflecting the effort, quality and technological advances that go into the services rendered by agents. Check out this link to one of several academic studies of the issue. Change is happening albeit slowly.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 26 2013
Several, a few, what's the difference? Change MAY be happening, but what I'm seeing is more people wanting full-service, not less.

  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 26 2013
Devon, 
    I'm curious as to your response to hpvanc's reply...I am absolutely not questioning you personally but, academically, your response implies the 500K seller is subsidizing the 50K seller's marketing.  If you get what you pay for, wouldn't that imply less effort/tools employed on the 50K home?

   To all, thank you for the continued conversation!  I am reading and each response provides much food for thought.  

   Just for clarity; regarding the list percentage in my original question, I wrote 1% but meant 4%.

Rob
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
I think that the phrase, "you get what you pay for," is best used AFTER the fact - when your cheap thing breaks on you.

In my experience, you can only HOPE to get what you pay for; if you pay LESS, you can't EXPECT to get more!

People vote with their dollar, and there's at least one flat-fee and fee-for-service and EBA and whatever niche provider in every market, and yet, it's the CONSUMER who seems to prefer paying sixty thousand rather than ten, in commissions, to sell a million dollar property.

What do you think, do you think millionaires like to throw money around frivolously?
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..
"if you pay LESS, you can't EXPECT to get more!"

We better get that memo out to those investing in Real Estate immediately!


Expecting to get more is kinda the drive behind investing, shopping, price comparison, not buying the first car or house you look at ect. ect.
Oh well...we best get the message out

"if you pay LESS, you can't EXPECT to get more!"
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
Dunes, that is below your standards. Pitiful.

  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..
Not below my standards at all nor do I agree with your opinion that it is "Pitiful"


Great thing about the Forum is all that pass through, look, are interested are free to decide what comments are "Pitiful" and I happen to believe most are capable of doing so
Perhaps some/all will agree with you and perhaps not

I'm willing to take the chance and fine with whatever decision they make

  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
Sorry about your standards, Dunes!

While we're talking about commissions, maybe you do get more by paying less. Auction houses charge more - a lot more - than real estate brokers. Fisher, for example, has a 10% buyer's premium on top of whatever they charge the sellers.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..



Thank you for the concern Mack...

Never thought much of your Auction House comparison
The many times you've tossed it I never really saw the relevancy you keep saying is there ...maybe someone else does or will



  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
Oh, Dunes, you must be under the weather.

The point is that auction houses charge more than real estate brokers to sell houses. A lot more. That's the point.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..
Naw I'm not under the weather but once again thanks for your concern..

I understand the point just not the relevancy...
Unless it's they charge more so you should use a Real Estate Agent/Agency
cause
You can expect to get the same Services/Results or more for less

I'd suggest amd do suggest people should also know & compare Agent/Agency Costs, Options, Services to determine if they could get the same Services/Results or more for less


  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
Profile picture for Pasadenan
Some agent posted on another thread that 20% to 30% of their commission is "overhead" for "prospecting for clients".  Seems to me, that if one reduces their commission even part of that, that the prospecting becomes less expensive and easier, and that the return becomes higher.  Not to mention, then the agent is doing their primary job - representing their client, for the sale or purchase of a house, rather than wasting time on things they don't enjoy, such harassing people with solicitations that don't want to be solicited.

And if a broker can reduce their risk, overhead and time by accepting only skilled experienced competent dedicated agents?  Then couldn't they reduce the commissions by almost 50% and still net more with less invested time and resources and risk?

As a small business owner, it has always seemed reasonable to adjust to the desires and needs of a client, rather than to waste tons of resources on trying to maintain the status quo, just because that was how it was done in the past.

Since there are about 1.2 million Realtors, and only about 5.1 million homes sold per year, that is only 4.25 transactions per year on average per agent.  Since two sides to each transaction, that is only an average of 8.5 transaction sides per agent.   The median home sold price in the U.S. is $219.6k  That implies the average income for an agent is about 1/2 of 5.5% of $219.6k x 4.25 full transactions = $25.7k

Reduce the broker overhead... reduce the commission by reducing the prospecting overhead...
.9 x 4.5% x $219.6k x 4.25 = $37.9k, for LESS work, and no less service to the clients.

Become more efficient at providing the service?  And even better rates of return.  Sell in a more expensive area, such as 91108?
Median sold price is $1.663 Million
.9 x 4% x $1663k x 4.25 = $254.4k

Seems like $254.4k take home pay for doing less work and reducing the client's transaction costs is much better to me.

Even in 91106:  Median sold price is $468.8k (including the condos; much higher if condos excluded):
.9 x 4.5% x $468.8k x4.25 = $80.7k
Still substantially better than the Realtor National average, for substantially less work.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
That's good, Pasa, but there's a flaw there: the real estate brokerage community consists of individual retail sales agents, rather than being a monolithic public utility. If we were, in fact, a monopoly, commissions could be fixed and agents would be salaried (of course, commissions might go through the roof, too!)

However, since we are all competing for business, there is an overhead - a cost - to compete; to prospect, harass homeowners, follow people around at open houses, all those things. That overhead cannot go away unless we can set up a system where the business finds us.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
September 30 2013
  • Be a Good Neighbor. Be respectful and on-topic. No spam or self-promotion! See our Good Neighbor Policy.
Related Discussions
Fellow Realtors/ Attorneys *Please be Aware of this Email Fraud Scam from China*
Profile picture for Kristin Wallace
Latest reply by Kristin Wallace
1 day ago | 107 answers
  • Posted by Ken Mischitelli
  • In Agents
  • April 17 2013
BANK OF AMERICA FHA SHORT SALES- STALLING TACTICS!!!
Profile picture for Sean Bell
Latest reply by Sean Bell
March 17 | 8 answers
  • Posted by Carol Pease, ABR, CRS, CRB
  • In Agents
  • June 18 2013
What's next?
Profile picture for Travis Wallach
Latest reply by Travis Wallach
February 27 | 6 answers
  • Posted by momitha
  • In Agents
  • August 21 2013
Transaction Coordinators: Obsolete in the world of digital signing?
Profile picture for Cindy Barnett
Latest reply by Cindy Barnett
February 25 | 13 answers
  • Posted by Darcy Logan
  • In Agents
  • May 12 2012
Witnesses for Power of Attorney Form
Profile picture for Mack McCoy
Latest reply by Mack McCoy
November 04 2013 | 1 answers
  • Posted by Marian Ingram
  • In Agents
  • November 04 2013
Be A Good Neighbor

Zillow Advice depends on each member to keep it a safe, fun, and positive place. If you see abuse, flag it. More on our Good Neighbor Policy.