Profile picture for John P

Floodplain Location Impact on Assessed Property Value

My home is now located in a floodplain (San Antonio, TX).  I want to use this information as a basis to request a reduction in my assessed property value.  There are not any comparable sales in my area to help determine the actual affect to the value of my home.  Is there a percentage or value reduction an appraiser would apply to a home located in a floodplain?
  • May 27 2010 - San Antonio
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Answers (7)

These maps are always evolving.  Call us if we can help.  I have heard of one corner of a house of being in a flood plain and the rest of the house was not.  But, the whole house needed the insurance.  This will be a issue for years to come.
  • May 28 2010
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Profile picture for ABBAUSA
I think you should consider purchasing flood insurance.

See the value they place on your home. (price flood insurance and get all details emailed to you.)

Use this information to your advantage.

If you have ever flooded before that is one thing, but now you are in a designated flood plain you have been given notice of potential flooding.

Let FEMA assist you through your local insurance agent as to the affect of this on your house value. 

Good Luck!

James Callas - Realtor®
  • May 29 2010
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Profile picture for wetdawgs
If you wish the assessed value to drop because it is in a flood plain, would you also be happy to have a buyer use the same logic?

Buy flood insurance, the federal emergency money is not sufficient.



  • May 29 2010
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Profile picture for ABBAUSA

The National Flood Insurance Program

The Flood Insurance and Mitigation Administration (FIMA), a component of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), manages the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The three components of the NFIP are:

Good Luck!

James Callas - Realtor®
  • May 29 2010
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Profile picture for Kryo1
How come everyone ignored John's question and decided to offer advice he did not want to pimp their own business?

John, I too have this same issue --- research studies have shown that being in a flood zone reduces your property value from 5-8%.

See the March 2008 issue of the Journal of Risk & Insurance.

Also this study by two professors:  http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/econ/upload/ecu0306.pdf

Good luck if not toooo late.
  • January 24 2014
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..... I get this post is FOUR years old, but its still an interesting question, sorry.....

My home is now located in a floodplain (San Antonio, TX).

Are you saying it recently was NOT located in a flood plain ? Or what ?

I want to use this information as a basis to request a reduction in my assessed property value.  There are not any comparable sales in my area to help determine the actual affect to the value of my home.  Is there a percentage or value reduction an appraiser would apply to a home located in a floodplain?

The study Kryo1 mentioned above might be of interest to you and your assessor in determining any decline in value, although that study dealt with post-hurricane properties and Im not sure if it would apply to your property.

I would talk to the assessor and ask if they dont already have a factor they reduce your property to because of the flood plain. If they feel there is a value difference, they might already factor it in. If not, show the assessor the study, and ask for an appeal. Calculate first, though, how much a 8% decline in your ASSESSED VALUE is going to translate out to $$ wise, and figure out if it is worth your time ot fight it.
  • January 24 2014
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Profile picture for sunnyview
@Kryo1 Thumbs for the great link!
@Vince Thumbs for the great answer!

I think that you have point. Although you should be able to prove a loss of value, assessors are more about what they want than the real impact of improvements. Appealing your taxes is worthwhile, but assessors will fight tooth and nail not to impact the tax base even when properties drop in value, are sold for a lower price, have major damage ie flood fire etc.

The numbers they use are often "magical" as opposed to evidence based. That does not mean that you should not appeal, but be prepared. I am aware of one area in CA where the flood maps are spotty. One house will be in a flood plain while the house across a flat street will not. These homes will have assessments that are the same with no discount given to the flood plain house.

I appealed my taxes and won, but you have to get comps, bring evidence and hope for the best. If it doesn't happen there is sometimes an appeal you can make to a higher board and those in my area tend to be more successful than the first go.
  • January 24 2014
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