Profile picture for user386106

House appraised $50k lower than seller expected!

My husband and I are in escrow in the Ventura County, CA area.  The house appraisal came in $50K lower than the seller, or us expected.  The seller now wants to pull out.  We don't want to lose the house, but at the same time we dont' want to overpay for one either.  It looks like the appraisor didn't use comps within the immediate area.  What can we do now?  Is is wise to renegotiate the price, going up $30K to what the house appraised at?  We would then have to fork out more $$ for another appraisal! 
We feel completely lost here and the agents (seller's and buyer's) are just as confused!
Also, the seller is listening to an older agent, no longer selling homes, that her house is worth more than what comps in the area.  We like the house, it's in an ideal area.
Can anyone advise us here? 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012 - Simi Valley
We think we've answered this question for you!
  • Be a Good Neighbor. Be respectful and on-topic. No spam or self-promotion! See our Good Neighbor Policy.
 
 

Answers (28)

Profile picture for hpvanc
Hopefully user386106, will come back with what they decided.  My point on the agents posting on this thread, was that it was extremely disgraceful and most likely malpractice if they are pushing the same advice on their clients.  The buyer can decide to buy it anyway if they have the cash, but a buyers fiduciary should never recommend overpaying.  There are several posts, that in my opinion are blatant attempts to persuade user386106 into overpaying, because the "market is up," "appraisers are too conservative" and etc.

I don't believe that posting advice like this on an open forum is illegal, but it certainly calls into question their ability to represent buyer clients in any meaningful capacity fiduciary or otherwise.  Hopefully consumers that are considering buying (or selling) are reading forums like these on multiple websites, they can learn a little about the real estate market and a lot about real estate agents.  I stand by my assertion, "with 'buyers' agents like this on job, a buyer certainly doesn't need more enemies."  Unfortunately the situation isn't much better for sellers.

For the record, I don't consider marketing training and experience as valid credentials for a buyers agent either.  The power of persuasion in any form does not equate as due diligence credentials.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 25 2012
@doralgate

What was the requirements to receive and Appraisers license vs a Realtors license?

Appraisers license is harder to get and maintain since its based on experience and education pimarily, were the Realtor's license is based on testing on mostly legal issues relating to all aspects of real estate sales. .. At least that is my experience.

Just wondering since it seems like most Realtors think they are the authority on real estate pricing...

Sometimes Realtors are the experts for their specific areas... appraisers generally are more aanalytical while Realtors tend to be more oriented towards sales only.

.also then wondering why the lenders just send out another Realtor to confirm the values of the property instead of an expensice appraiser???

BPO's Realtors (and I) do cost less and only give ballparks values, which may be what is all that is necessary for the lenders requirment, appraisals based more on facts (comps and market based adjustments) but cost more due to due diligence put into the valuation. Appraisers are also unbiased as they are paid for their time not incentivized by a possible future commissions as Realtors 'may' be.

I guess "value is in the eye of the beholder"

Yes, appraisers value a property based on a typical 'want' from a buyer. IE if there is a special utility a home may have (observatory in the backyard) we would value it based on what a typical buyer would pay not a astromomer, making the seller/borrower not that happy sometimes... :(

  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 24 2012
Some good points there, Tiffany. It is so true that getting a real estate license does little (if anything) to prepare you for being a real estate agent. And most people who take the license exam just want to get the license. Once they have that in their hands, they forget much of what they had been taught.

Not an ideal situation. Unfortunately it is what we have.

Then if you join a good brokerage, perhaps they will provide you with good real-world raining and perhaps they won't.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 24 2012
@Bernard

I think the problem you are experiencing is the big fuzzy area that is fiduciary duty. One can argue that helping the buyer get what they want fulfills that duty. One could also easily argue that aiding someone in overpayment of a property is a breach of that duty. Neither one of those opinions is categorically wrong.

In my personal experience, the process of getting a real estate license doesn't do a particularly good job of examining different ethical philosophies. Given the quite limited +/- 60 clock hours to become an agent, and that topic itself being one many spend years studying, it would be unrealistic to expect that to be a core component of licensure. The fact of the matter is that there is a low bar to become an agent. It costs less in time, money and effort than a year of community college. Heck, even massage therapists require more clock hours in many jurisdictions (not all places license massage therapists). Since there really isn't a large amount of consistent training as to what the real role and boundaries of buyers agents are, that allows for a much more broad interpretation of what buyers agents actually should do in situations like this.

For the OP's situation, I would argue that $50k can buy some pretty dang nice upgrades to a house that they like almost as much - no matter how much they like the home they have under contract. If they were a cash buyer with near-unlimited resources and were not concerned with going upside down, overpaying, being beholden to a mortgage company - that would change the duty in my opinion.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 24 2012
I guess we will have to agree to disagree on that one. When I represent a buyer, I never try to persuade them to write an offer on anything and I make it clear that this is how I work when I first meet them. I see my job as to interpret what they want (and can afford) to buy based on lengthy discussion and then I make sure they know about any homes that are relevant. When they find a home that they decide is "the one", I prepare a buyers Market Analysis for them based on the past 3 months sales of similar homes and advise them as to what I think they need to offer to be in with a chance of getting it.

Mostly this is an approach that works for me and my clients and it gets me lots of referrals as a result. Nobody is under any pressure from me at any time and I sometimes work with a buyer for many months before they write an offer. That is not a problem to me. MY concern is that they get what they want.

The fact is, I consider taking listings and representing buyers as two separate jobs. There is nothing sales related when I represent buyers. And even when I take a listing, I consider it more of a marketing related situation than a sales one. Of course my background is marketing and technology, not sales, so that probably helps to explain my outlook. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 24 2012
Profile picture for hpvanc
Bernard,

Might I suggest you either seek some housing related training that is completely non-sales oriented or go out and work a non-sales job for at least 6 months.  No personal offense intended, but your posts represent many problems with buyers agents.  You are not and cannot be a salesperson and truly represent a buyer.  What you are doing is representing sellers in general and calling yourself a "buyers" representative.  Sometimes that may actually call for keeping the buyer unemotional and grounded, in other words a big part of your job when you represent buyers, makes your job when you are a listing agent more difficult.  Unless the buyer can tell you when they have taken the emotional component out of the equation to do what you have to, to close the deal, as far as I am concerned you have committed malpractice as a professional representing buyers.  Truly representing buyers versus what you can get away with when representing sellers are entirely different skills.

I mean no personal offense with this comment either, but I seriously question whether consumers should be tolerant of people that choose to have full time permanent sales jobs.  It is in my opinion not in my best interest when I buy anything, and is a primary cause of most of the ills the US economy suffers.  I consider the acceptance by consumers of full time permanent sales jobs to be the primary cause of the seemingly permanent trade deficit.  It has caused an anti-product attitude that is pervasive throughout the economy.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 24 2012
hpvanc I have to take issue with some of your comments.
When I work as a Buyer's Agent my fiduciary responsibilityis to my buyer. I want to get the price for the best possible price. But if he wants the house, he may have to pay over the appraised vaule. That is Realism!

When I work as a Seller's Agent, my job is to get the best price I can. As far as I am concened, this is not rocket science. My fiduciary duty is clear on all counts.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 23 2012
If the appraiser picked genuinely horrible comps - which I have seen happen - then you can appeal and/or hire a second appraisal (both of which I have done quite successfully with an inappropriate appraisal). By horrible comps, I mean something out there, like: is this house on a nice, tree-lined, two-lane street with charming cobblestone sidewalks full of well-maintained homes and it was compared to a house in need of repair next door to a busy and undesirable business on a six lane highway four miles away?

Unless the comps were way out in left field, you are unlikely to close a gap of that size...nor would you want to.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 23 2012
Profile picture for hpvanc
user386106,

Take Vince or someone like him up on his offer.  If necessary hire an appraiser for a desk review.  Whatever you do don't be fooled by the wolves in sheeps clothing masquerading as "buyers" agents, in any market.

What I see here is a group of "buyers" agents doing everything they can in an attempt to raise prices.  Unfortunately it is not limited to the few agents that have responded to this forum thread or other online forums.  It is a concerted effort by "buyers" agents working directly against buyers fiduciary interests everyday in the market.  It takes a very different set of credentials to work in the fiduciary interest of a buyer, than it does to work in the fiduciary interest of a seller.  Licensing requirements are still heavily if not completely slanted to the sellers side, and education, especially training provided through the Realtor® associations seems to work completely against buyers interests even when it it alleged to be "buyers" agent training.

This problem played directly into the inflation of the historic real estate bubble, and is one of the biggest reputation deficiencies agents face today.  Any agent that believes, as most of the agents replying to this thread seem to believe, that they can continue to act like a salesperson and represent themselves as a "buyers" fiduciary representative, is in my opinion criminally misrepresenting themselves.  If you are working in as a buyers fiduciary you must always be pushing for sustainable value. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 23 2012
Profile picture for doralgate
Vince since I just noticed that you seem to have both licenses....What was the requirements to receive and Appraisers license vs a Realtors license?

Just wondering since it seems like most Realtors think they are the authority on
real estate pricing....also then wondering why the lenders just send out another Realtor to confirm the values of the property instead of an expensice appraiser???

I guess "value is in the eye of the beholder"

  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 23 2012
Listen to your heart.  Value is in the eye of the beholder.

Do you feel like you will ever find a home like the one you have set your eyes on?  How much more than others are you willing to overpay?

If you do schedule another appraisal, have your agent there with comps within the immediate area in his/her hands to show the appraiser.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 23 2012

Could be a lot of different factors - Im local to Simi - click on my photo for contact info and I can advise .......

  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 23 2012
Profile picture for doralgate
Bernard. I very much agree that real estate is very local....however appraisers have the same information you Realtors do and it seems now that they are forced to do independent appraisals they value properties just a little lower than Realtors in general....calling it a mattter of who do trust more between the two might be wrong but that's probably what it boils down to.
As for me I would trust myself most and purchasing a property by bringing extra cash to closing, to be in an immediatly more negative position than what I had wanted to, is no a good proposition. I don't envy anybody that has to make that decision if that is the only house available and good luck to the OP....
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 23 2012
Very true, Doralgate. It so clearly shows how true the old adage "Real Estate is local" is.

In a market with lots of sellers, nobody should pay above appraised value. In a market like ours (San Francisco East Bay), there are so many more buyers than sellers and inventory levels are ridiculously low. No surprise that most nice homes get multiple offers over list price.

The easily anticipated result of all this is homes fail to appraise. Then some renegotiation is in order.

I have no idea what the market is like in Simi Valley but market conditions will always be a guide to the appropriate response to a low valuation.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 23 2012
Profile picture for doralgate
@hpvanc -- AMEN to your response....not a lot more that needs to be said....there is NO reason to overpay (providedthe appraIaisal stands)  for a property whith plenty of sellers out there. Especially not overpaying by that much...
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 23 2012
This is a really important issue and a fairly complicated one.

Don't waste your time trying to challenge the appraisal.  It may have come in short for a variety of reasons, but regardless you won't get anywhere.  In some cases the appraiser comes in at value but the bank will instruct the appraiser to adjust the amount, other times the appraiser doesn't know the market, and many times the appraiser is right and you're paying too much.  Regardless of the reason for the low valuation, you're better off taking it to the seller to renegotiate the price or, if it's a highly competitive market, eating the difference.  It also depends on the type of loan - FHA appraisals, for example, stay with the property so any subsequent FHA buyer would use the same valuation.  Just keep in mind that the appraisal is there to protect the lender, and you, from overpaying and getting underwater.  So even though this may be a great house, it's best to be conservative and pay what the house is worth.

Good luck!
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
Joseph has it right. Update the CMA and politely ask for a review of the appraisal. Present the new CMA and the appraiser may adjust his estimate.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
Profile picture for hpvanc
Isn't it amazing to see buyers agents that allegedly have a fiduciary responsibility to protect buyers interests, are quick to help you as a buyer fight a $400 appraisal that works in your favor, or help you justify paying more than appraisal for a property, ultimately costing you somewhere in the neighborhood of ~$30,000?  With "buyers" agents like this on job, a buyer certainly doesn't need more enemies.

Stand your ground, unless you are sure the appraisal is wrong.  Agents tend to present CMA's and pick comps that are extremely optimistic.  The era of housing price growth without supporting wage growth and general inflation to support it is over, natural economic law has prevailed over marketing. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012

I removed my response, i'm no longer confused.

  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
Profile picture for user386106
Ofe, we are getting a loan and putting dwn 20%. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
This is happening all the time in my area (San Francisco East Bay). We are in a rising market but appraisers do not accept that fact. Agents are on the front line and we KNOW what the market is doing.

What typically happens is that byer and seller split the difference (providing buyer still qualifies for financing at the new appraised figure). Otherwise, the deal falls apart.

Not a lot of point questioning the appraisal - we have done this a few times but it is always rejected. Lenders are very conservative!
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
The first thing you need to do is have your agent run an updated CMA, then contact the Appraiser and have him/her review it.  The appraiser may wish to go back to the home to review, and may charge a fee for doing so, but it will be cheaper than another appraisal.

Perhaps he will raise the appraisal to a point where the seller will be happy, yet still lower than your current offer and both of you will be happy.

If the apprasier stands their ground, I would move on.  No sense paying $45K over appraisal.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
Profile picture for user386106
I just got off the phone with the agent.  The reasonable comps for that property are around $550K-$565K.  If the seller is willing to accept this, we need to decide if we should offer $550K, pay for another appraisal, and have the paperwork go to another lender.  Seller's agent stated she won't consider $550K, but we dont' want to waste another $400 if the house doesn't appraise to what seller thinks her house is worth.
What a mess!
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
Profile picture for B Mike West
Not all appraisals are correct. I agree with Angela. You should get another appraisal and if it confirms what you suspect is the correct market value go back to your lender and tell them their appraiser made a mistake. 

Have your buyer's agent pull the comps that they feel represent like homes in the area as additional ammo when dealing with your lender. PUSH BACK, don't roll over.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
Before you hire another appraiser, why don't you ask your buyer agent to do another CMA, and compare the comps that were used and/or omitted from the appraisal at hand.  If that does not make sense, then I would hire another appraiser.  You do not say if you are paying cash for the property or whether you are getting a mortgage.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
Profile picture for user386106
Sorry, let me clarify a bit.  We offered $565K, which she accepted.  The appraisal came in at $520K.  The seller is not willing to let her house go for that amount, thus this is why she wasn't to pull out.  The comps in the area are going for $540k-$560k roughly.  As the buyers we thought it would appraise at $550K, that's why our agent suggesed to renegotiate the offer. 
I hope I've explained this better.  It 's been a loong day.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
I would purchase another appraisal for a second opinion. Also, your agent should run reasonable comps for that property. Paying more is never a good idea, besides your lender will not loan you the money for it if its not worth it unless you are paying cash?
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
Profile picture for doralgate
I don't understand why would you renegotiate UP when you are in escrow already? Seems to me that you bought wisely at $30k below appraisal....why would the seller pull out...he accepted your offer in a contract in writing? You may need to clarify....sure the seller would like out and get another $30k but he agreed to sell to you at the accepted offer price...didn't he?
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
August 22 2012
 
Related Questions
What are the qualification standards to buy a house?
Profile picture for Todd Kaufman
Latest answer by Todd Kaufman
May 31 | 2 answers
what does " make me move" mean exactly
Profile picture for Dunes ..
Latest answer by Dunes ..
October 17 2013 | 4 answers
Home Ownership After Foreclosure or Short Sale?
Profile picture for LadyJo
Latest answer by LadyJo
September 19 2012 | 3 answers
House appraised $50k lower than seller expected!
Profile picture for hpvanc
Latest answer by hpvanc
August 25 2012 | 28 answers
Can I buy a second home as a primary residence when first home is FHA rental property?
Profile picture for sunshinelaw
Latest answer by sunshinelaw
March 02 2012 | 7 answers
Mortgage Rates
 
Be A Good Neighbor

Zillow Advice depends on each member to keep it a safe, fun, and positive place. If you see abuse, flag it. More on our Good Neighbor Policy.

Homes for Sale
  1. 574 Oak Tree Ct, Simi Valley, CA Home For Sale
    574 Oak Tree Ct, Simi Valley, CA 93065

     For Sale: $995,000

    • Beds: 5
    • Sqft: 3976
    • Baths: 5.0
    • Lot: 11129
  2. 2066 Hurles Ave, Simi Valley, CA Home For Sale
    2066 Hurles Ave, Simi Valley, CA 93063

     For Sale: $559,000

    • Beds: 3
    • Sqft: 1328
    • Baths: 2.0
    • Lot: 7048
  3. 1166 Roldan Ave, Simi Valley, CA Home For Sale
    1166 Roldan Ave, Simi Valley, CA 93065

     For Sale: $459,900

    • Beds: 3
    • Sqft: 1303
    • Baths: 2.0
    • Lot: 5458