Profile picture for ninaft

How do I determine my lot size and its dimensions?

  • December 15 2010 - Greenbrier East
  • 0
    0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Be a Good Neighbor. Be respectful and on-topic. No spam or self-promotion! See our Good Neighbor Policy.

Answers (6)

I have the lot size as 1115.57sq ft. How do I get the dimensions?
  • September 17 2013
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

@Eugene Hacker - Good advice. Most parcel maps have dimensions.
  • August 30 2012
  • 1Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Check the Cities Website, or give an agent a call if you know any. Many times the size of the lot is listed in the city tax records. 
  • August 30 2012
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for RhiannaMTibbetts

When you search for a home If you look at the "Lot Size" field, you will see a set of numbers. If the numbers are something like 100×100, it's easy: a square lot with each side measuring 100ft. But 72x70x99x45x26? Which side is which dimension, and what is the total overall size?

Let's start with the basics. Standard convention says that the street side is the first dimension listed, and then the other dimensions follow clock-wise. For example, if you have a lot size of 60×130, the street side measures 60ft and the lot goes back 130ft.

If there are only 2 dimensions listed (60×60 or 60×130, for example), it implies that the lot is either square- or rectangular- shaped.

If there are 3 dimensions listed (60x80x100, for example), the lot is a triangle, with the street side measuring 60ft. Triangular-shaped lots are not very common.

As soon as you have more than 3 dimensions, it becomes increasingly difficult to determine the shape of a lot. You may see 60x130x60x130. Although the opposite sides measure the same length, the lot is not necessarily rectangular; it could be rhombus-shaped. With 4 completely different dimensions, it helps to draw it out on paper to get a better approximation of the lot size. When you go look at a house, you can usually get visual clues to determine where the property line ends (fence, tree lines, etc.), which helps to simplify visualizing the size.

Going back to our earlier example of 72x70x99x45x26, we have 5 dimensions, or 5 sides. At this point, it's practically impossible to determine the shape of a lot without actually seeing it. Fortunately, plat maps exist which depict what the lot size and layout are for any piece of land
Plat maps are a great resource. I use them often to verify lot sizes for clients and to understand the all-so-common terms that some agents use

Whether you're looking for a home with a small lot, a large lot, or an "irregular" lot, I can help you find it. No detail is too small to double-check. I can show you the plat maps, and we can verify that you are getting all of the land that the seller is claiming to be selling (believe it or not, some agents have been known to write down the wrong lot size) nobody is perfect all the time. one small typo can make a BIG difference.
there is also the old fashioned way to get a rough idea if there are no plat maps or you cant wait to talk to the county, and it is sometimes a good idea to have a general idea before going to the assessors office, and that would be to use graph paper and draw out the area by using the squares to get a shape and approximate size.
  • August 08 2012
  • 1Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Did you get a survey when you purchased your property?  You may not remember getting one,  but often they are required by the bank and will be with your other papers in a file.  If not,  you can go to the court house and there may be a survey or plat recorded there.  Some cities even have this on line now.  Got to your city's web site and check there.  And finally,  there may be "pins" or markers in the ground,  marking your property line. They are difficult to find...but a surveyor can usually find them pretty quickly.  
  • December 18 2010
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

The two easiest ways are:

1 - check the paperwork when you purchased.  Lot size is often listed and it is common to have a plot map (with dimensions) in the title report.


2 - this information is generally in the county records.  This information is available online in some areas.  Otherwise contact the county and they should be able to point you in the right direction.
  • December 16 2010
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.