How much Wattage on a single breaker.

I have eight 150W par38 lamps. Can I run these from a single 15Amp Breaker (with a GFI), or do i need to split it between two breakers?
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
November 15 2009 - Bradenton
We think we've answered this question for you!
  • Be a Good Neighbor. Be respectful and on-topic. No spam or self-promotion! See our Good Neighbor Policy.
 
 

Answers (10)

Profile picture for Pasadenan
As others already mentioned, even if outdoors, you don't typically GFIC them, unless in or near a pool or similar.  Only if there is a potential for someone to be "wet" and "in contact" with them (or water that is in contact with them) do they require to be GFIC.

As for the "fluorescent" idea?  Not so good if one was intending to dim them on a dimmer.  I've also seen problems with some motion sensing devises for fluorescent.  Not to mention, most residential grade motion sensors are limited to 800 watts.

For pool lighting, I would look into fiber optics to provide the additional safety by keeping the electrical devices away from the pool.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
January 12 2012
Problem most likely remedied since 2009, however here is more information.  The NEC allows you to use 80 % of the potential of the circuit. So (120v x 15amp = 1800watts) - 80% gives you max allowed amperage of 1440watts. So if you have 8ea 150w par 38 bulbs you can add them up. (8 x 150w = 1200w) you would only have to gfci them if they are outdoors.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
January 12 2012
You may be able to so long as no other loads will be on the circuit as well. If you are planning on using the circuit that is already GFI protected. Don't.
Lights on GFI's don't do well.
There are always other options consult a good electrician and have them do the work. Usually a good electrician is one that does their own work, has been licensed for 10 plus years and you can check them out with the state and they are have no complaints on their license.



  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
February 12 2010
you can run it on the same circuit but GFI breaker doesn't make sense probably you talking about AFCI breaker.( looks the same like GFI breaker)
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
January 07 2010
Profile picture for goodhousehunting
why are you GFI protecting them?

out door lighting ( flood lights ) do not require GFCI protection
out door receptacles do ( that goes for garages as well )

yes you can run them on a 15 amp breaker and you have a good margin of safety

the 80% rule for a breaker depends on the load

so if you got 15 amps x 120 volts = 1800 watts x 80% = 1440 watts that you can safely load up the circuit and it will not trip. 3 hours or more is considered continious use and the 80% rule applies to constant loads, intermittant loads of the full 1800 watts are not issue, as the breaker is rated at 100% load for intermittant use ( such as a 20 amp receptacle with might actually see 20 amps for a brief period of time, thus not over heating the breaker and thus tripping).  but generally lighting is figured at 80% rule to assume the worst case scenario (all light fixture on that circuit on ).
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
December 24 2009
Profile picture for ThePoopingBandit
Technically, yes you can run 8x150W lamps from a 15A Breaker, IF they are the only draw on the circuit.  It is not wise to do so, however.  I would highly recommend looking into fluorescent PAR38 Bulbs instead.  For 150W Incandescent equivalent, you're talking 18-22W per bulb, putting you at or just over the draw of a single incandescent bulb from the entire array of fluorescent.  If money is no object, LED lighting to match 150W Incandescent is around 7W, with total consumption being around 1/3 of 1 incandescent from the entire array - only problem is those bulbs are not cheap - anywhere from $30ish at CostCo/Sams Club type stores to $70 or more from lighting supply houses.

HTH
TPB
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
December 23 2009
1200 watts on a 15 amp breaker is ok although you may have a problem with light bulbs wired to a GFI. You could cut back to a 100w bulb and have close to the same results using only 800watts. You could also use fluorescent flood lights or a low voltage lighting system to save even more energy. Hiring a professional electrician like Priority Electric can show you how to SAFELY and efficiently light your home.   
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
December 06 2009
 1200 watts on a 15 amp breaker is ok although you may have a problem with light bulbs wired to a GFI. You could cut back to a 100w bulb and have close to the same results using only 800watts. You could also use fluorescent flood lights or a low voltage lighting system to save even more energy. Hiring a professional electrician like Priority Electric can show you how to SAFELY and efficiently light your home.   
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
December 05 2009
Profile picture for impaler603
Michael is right.  One other thing though, a 15A circuit breaker will trip with an 80% constant load.  If your lights are not the only thing on that circuit you will want to split it up.
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
December 05 2009
I got this from Yahoo.

 It's watts divided by volts equals amps.
Example: 1200 watts at 120 volts is 10 amps.
To get the watts if you know the amps, multiply the amps times the volts. 10 amps at 120 volts is 1200 watts

So 8 x 150 = 1200 which is divided by 120 volts = 10 amps

I am NOT an electrician. Just having fun with math. Always consult with a professional if you are not sure. 
  Flag content
Close
Report a Problem

Please enter a valid email address.

Close
Content flagged

We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

Close
We're Sorry
This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.
November 15 2009
 
Related Questions
does having garage floor epoxy improve value
Profile picture for Marcus Vanzant
Latest answer by Marcus Vanzant
September 10 2013 | 10 answers
How much Wattage on a single breaker.
Profile picture for Pasadenan
Latest answer by Pasadenan
January 12 2012 | 10 answers
the info about my house is outdated - how do I change that?
Profile picture for John Stewart
Latest answer by John Stewart
June 13 2011 | 1 answers
can a lighting circuit consisting of 20 standard fittings be run off a single dimmer switch
Profile picture for Priority Electric
Latest answer by Priority Electric
February 12 2010 | 7 answers
Be A Good Neighbor

Zillow Advice depends on each member to keep it a safe, fun, and positive place. If you see abuse, flag it. More on our Good Neighbor Policy.

Homes for Sale
  1. 701 Oak St, Bradenton, FL Home For Sale
    701 Oak St, Bradenton, FL 34208

     For Sale: $349,000

    • Beds: 3
    • Sqft: 1823
    • Baths: 2.0
    • Lot: 177724
  2. 7052 Hawks Harbor Cir, Sarasota, FL Home For Sale
    7052 Hawks Harbor Cir, Sarasota, FL 34210

     For Sale: $2,495,000

    • Beds: 4
    • Sqft: 5188
    • Baths: 5.0
    • Lot: 17424
  3. 1535 18th St E, Bradenton, FL Home For Sale
    1535 18th St E, Bradenton, FL 34208

     For Sale: $45,000

    • Beds: 3
    • Sqft: 1130
    • Baths: 1.0
    • Lot: 18295