Profile picture for user409202

If a house is listed at 210,000 How much can I low ball and get away with it?

I was approve for 200,000. I can only afford 180,000 is there a way to to bring a 210,000 house down to at least 190,000? I don't want to waist time if not.If yes, please explain how's the best way to low ball.

Thank you in advance.

  • April 27 2012 - Houston
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Answers (9)

Best Answer

Profile picture for Ofe Polack
Ask your buyer agent to run a CMA for you.  If all you can afford is $180,000 that's all you can offer, as simple as that!  You do not say if it is a short sale or bank owned and that also will make a difference.  There is no magic way to low ball, you win a few and lose a few.  Good luck!
  • April 27 2012
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Great responses in here, so true is it that there is no best way.  Every situation is different on the sellers and buyers side.  What is important is you know how much you can spend and you do what is best for you and your family.
Rely on your Realtor to help give you sound financial advice and act on the information he/she gives you.  
Our profession is to provide you with as much information you need to make the best financial decision for you and your family!
  • January 02 2013
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Profile picture for wreynol4
Any offer can be valid if it is backed up with a very solid reason, or series of reasons.  I would have your REALTOR run a CMA for you to judge how well your offer looks.  The more information you can give in support of your offer the better prepared you will be to respond to any and all questions.  Good luck!
  • October 23 2012
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 It is not good to waste peoples time but then again you never know what might stick if you do throw an offer out.  If you do plan to lowball make sure you have evidence to back up your offer. What does the town say it is worth? What do the comparative properties come in at? Is there anything wrong with the property that you could take on to repair vs the homeowner?
  Every market is different and every sellers motivation is different so you never know. Put your best foot forward and give it a try.
  • September 27 2012
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I agree, each home is different plus each seller is different, everyone has their own reason for moving, if they are in a rush, they may accept a lower offer, a CMA really helps, its also not a good idea to offend someone by offering too low a price, the seller is not obligated to come back and counter offer.  My advise is, always offer what you are willing to pay for the property.
  • September 27 2012
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I agree with Ofe- There is no magic formula- If the house is priced well @210 than they are going to expect their offers at that price- however, if your agent runs a cma and 210 is not inline with the comps than that would help support your case for a lower offer. i would give it your best and know that it may be a long shot so be prepared for a no.
  • April 27 2012
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Howdy,

If you were to put down a large earnest money deposit, that may tip off the seller that you are a serious buyer.  If you are buying cash and closing quickly, that might also tip off the seller that you are serious.
Have your inspector do a thorough inspection once you have made an offer on the house.  The report will tell you and the seller what items have deferred maintenance and/or life & safety issues that can convince the seller to take a lower price for the house. If the seller doesn't want to lower the price, you can get your earnest money deposit back if there is an inspection contingency in the purchase agreement.

Good Luck
  • April 27 2012
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Profile picture for wetdawgs
There is no absolute rule on how much you can low ball a property.   You need to (with help of your buyer's agent) compile comps for the property to get an idea of today's market value.     

If the house has been on the market for a long long time, perhaps they'd accept $190,000.

The best way to not waste your time is to look at houses within your price range.   It is really easy to be tantalized by a home that is priced just outside your reach, so why bother to torture yourself that way?



  • April 27 2012
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Profile picture for mariasimsteam
The best way to give someone a low ball number is to back it up with valid reasons and facts.  Give them comparable sales and listings.  Feel free to mention maintenance and physical issues of the home that need repair.  A buyers agent will use other information such as time the house has been on the market and how much the owner owes on the house.

Good luck!!  Currently in Atlanta, we are dealing with multiple offers on homes and houses are going above listing prices.  
  • April 27 2012
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