Profile picture for harryhappy

Is it necessary to seal new grout in bathroom wall and floor tiles? Is the spray any god?

  • April 01 2009 - US
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Answers (19)

Most painting stores provide a caulk to home owners and painting contractors for showers and tubes, made by DAP. This is worthless as the day is long. Gives way to turn yellow, create mildew, and eventually pull away, needing to do it all over again. Where this is needed is at 90 degree angles where tiles and tiles to shower pans meet. Finding the Very Best Tub and Shower Caulk available that comes in any grout color made, TEC AccuColor Sanded Siliconized Acrylic Latex Caulk. Good Luck now using the Best Tile Caulk.
  • October 03 2010
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Most painting stores provide a caulk to home owners and painting contractors for showers and tubes, made by DAP. This is worthless as the day is long. Gives way to turn yellow, create mildew, and eventually pull away, needing to do it all over again. Where this is needed is at 90 degree angles where tiles and tiles to shower pans meet. Finding the Very Best Tub and Shower Caulk available that comes in any grout color made, TEC AccuColor Sanded Siliconized Acrylic Latex Caulk. Good Luck now using the Best Tile Caulk.
  • October 03 2010
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This is a time investment that is definitely worth it.  Offer your kids $20 for every coat.  Do about three coats.  The last house we sold, we had lived there about 8 years.  Our white grout looked just like it did the day I grouted it because we sealed it well.  It's a lot easier to keep clean too.
  • June 18 2010
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If your grout is white or very light color, seal it. Otherwise it's OK to leave as it is. We've done it both ways.
  • May 22 2010
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Profile picture for pmatusoff
This is such a simple job that its a no-brainer.  You can get a small brush or even a couple of the foam pad brushes and just dip and follow the grout lines in no time at all.  If you have light colored grout, its even more important to seal it because grout is quite porous and will absorb stains easily.  I once had a kitchen with white grout and also had two small children who loved fruit juices.  The only way to remove the stains was to periodically brush the grout lines with a toothbrush dipped in diluted bleach!  You don't want to do this, believe me.

Think of the many colored products used in a bathroom:  blue Lysol mouthwash, green Scope mouthwash, cosmetics in reds, browns, black, purples, blues, etc.  If you have a family member who colors their hair, yikes!

Save yourself the regrets and just seal the grout!
  • May 19 2010
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I would seal it. It isn't going to be a very big project and will only help in the longevity of your tile work.
  • April 28 2010
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Profile picture for jimij15
hey, honestly based on my knowledge most tile rennovations lack ther of the grout sealer, although in a place like a kichen-a lot of foot trsffic the grout could get real dirty, especially if it's a light color
  • April 13 2010
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Profile picture for Darrell45
nice share
  • April 05 2010
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Avoid spray sealants in the shower areas... they don't last well.
Porcelain and glazed tiles won't accept sealant of course, but the grout does.
...  
Porous, Stone, Natural or Travertine will need to be sealed but the color enhancement is well worth it!  Consult with a local supplier for Sq Ft amount and applications... liquid and sponge are rather simple for anyone to use.
...
Now get busy!
  • March 11 2010
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Profile picture for Electric Fungus
It depends on what kind of grout was used on the install as some have epoxy and or urathane binders in them mostly used on high end installs and extreme surroundings and they will not need any sealing, if it is a cement based which most are then it will need maintenance. If you are resealing existing grout it can be important to try and figure out what if anything was used before, if nothing you can use any of the water or solevent based products. If it has been sealed by one or the other you should try and stick to what was used in the past. This can be a bit tricky to establish but with s test spot you can usually tell. I prefer the solvent based but it depends on the environmental factors. Good Luck with your grout....
  • February 21 2010
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Yes, you absolutely want to seal the grout, esp in the bathroom.  It will preserve the color and texture.  Otherwise, it will get rather dirty.  You should prob. reseal every year or so.The only exception to this would be if your contractor used grout w/ grout sealer already in it such as Laticrete's Spectralock grout.www.westchester.floorcoveringsinternational.com
  • August 16 2009
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Profile picture for FlooredAgain
Obviously, glazed tile, porcelain and glass will not accept a sealer. Grout will but use a solvent based, penetrating sealer that can be brushed on. They're not cheap. DO NOT use silicone sealers...they dissapate within a few days and are worthless. Read the mfgs. directions but a couple of coats, waiting a couple of hours inbetween will last a couple of years in wet areas such as showers. Stil after taking a shower, wipe down the walls with your towel...sealing grout will not keep soap scum from attaching itself to the tile and grout., no matter what anyone says. A small pint of a very good sealer will last several years if doing a normal size shower, less for larger, custom showers. Go to a tile specialty store for this item...the sealers at the big boxes are primarily silicone and, like I said before, useless. A good one to use in Miracle's 511 Porous Plus.
  • August 08 2009
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Yes, ALWAYS seal grout.  You should then re-seal every 6 - 12 months depending on use.  In a bathroom tub surround, I would seal every 6 months. 

Any stone / natural unpolished tile - like travertine, slate, etc. needs to be sealed, as they absorb dirt if they are not. 

Porcelain and glazed type tiles do not have to be sealed, but the grout does.  We use tile-lab brand in liquid form and have had great results with it.  It is simple to apply and has virtually no odor.

The spray can type works well, but is too environmentally UNfriendly, and horrible to work with due to the fumes.

Also - when / if you ever install slate or stone, it is very improtant to seal the stone 2x minimum before you install the grout, to help release the grout from the stone for your final clean.  It is WELL worth taking the extra time and expense.

Best wishes.  Happy sealing.
  • May 08 2009
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As previously posted most of the time unless your working with natural stone tile the tile itself does not need to be sealed.  It is really the grout joints that get sealed to prevent staining.  Furthermore, sealers can also be enhancers and really bring out the color in the tile when dealing with natural porous stone.  No matter what the situation, I always seal all my tile jobs and I would use any kind that comes in a bottle and you apply with a sponge.  It could not be an easier job for a homeowner to do.  It is like cleaning your floor.  The spray is a little gimmicky and I am sure it works but is probably not the best product out there.  Here is an example of the difference between before and after with slate tile when it is sealed with an enhancer. 
  • May 08 2009
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Most porcelain tile does not need to be sealed, neither does the grout.
(this is the kind of tile you use for kitchen counter tops)
Tumbled marble, used in showers, that is very porous needs to be sealed.
  • April 12 2009
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I've used the solvent based spray and the bottle form as well.  I do a lot of painting and the aerosol based sealer is POTENT.  I would prefer to never use it again.  I like the bottled form; it loosens extra grout and makes the final cleaning easier.

  • April 11 2009
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If you seal the tile how am I going to make my residual money on removing and replacing your stained grout?
  • April 11 2009
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Profile picture for wetdawgs
Seal!
  • April 03 2009
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I have done quite a few bathrooms. Our tile subcontractor never suggests sealing unless the homeowner or designer asks for it.
Have never used the spray, only the liquid that comes in a bottle.
  • April 03 2009
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