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Is there anyway to fight a rent increase if the landlord forgets to renew on time?

My landlord forgot to renew my lease and 2 months after it expired they increased my rent by 8% effective November 1 (meanwhile, I got this notice on the 2nd of November).  I've been an excellent tenant, consistently paying on-time (even without having a lease).  I've got good credit and could easily move, but moving is a pain and I like where I live.  Any suggestions for what I could do to get my landlords to come back down to a more normal price?
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November 02 2011 - West Village
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renters renew leases, not landlords. not extending the lease as soon as it expired simply turned you into a month-to-month tenant. none of these things have anything to due with a potential rent increase on the next lease. you landlord has every right to increase the rent if he want to. in turn, you do not have to accept the increase and you can move to another apartment
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December 07 2011
I would recommend you talk to your landlord and try to negotiate with him/her. Maybe meet somewhere in the middle. A landlord must give you a 30 day notice if the rent increase is 10% or less and 60 day notice if more than 10%. Unless you are living in a rent control unit, this is legitimate. Try to work something out with landlords - they usually are understanding. Let me know if I can be of any help. Best, Josh.
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November 22 2011
Rents are increasing, even for great tenants. You may want to consider wether or not to take a hard line. There is a cost to relocating and you do like where you live.

By all means, take a shot and negotiate, but you may want to take a moment and do a little cost/benefit analysis.
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November 04 2011
Profile picture for sunnyview
November is a great time to negotiate with your landlord since most landlords do not want a vacant property over the holidays.

Tell them that you cannot afford that large increase and than you would offer 2-4% or will have to give your 30 day notice to find another place. Make sure they they know that you do not want to move, but that the increase is too shocking all at one time.
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November 04 2011
I agree , look at the landlord tenant act. After the first year, I would think your contract stated you go month to month with allowable rent increases. Talk to your landlord, ask them how they would feel if you moved out now, in the winter months where tenants are generally difficult to find, that a month worth of no rent would cost the same as not raising rent. Point out that you have been an excellent tenant,which is hard to come by in many cases. Negotiate. In the meantime, look around, see if you can find something less expensive to rent and lock in for two years. Best of luck to you.
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November 04 2011
Profile picture for wetdawgs
Pull up your state's landlord/tenant guidelines (you can google it).  Most of them have definition of the amount of notice that is required for a rent increase.

8% would be a shock, but there are many reasons for such a increase.  Perhaps the property was lower than fair market value, perhaps there was a very small (or no) increase last year.  

good luck
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November 02 2011
Sometimes there are increases in property duties. This could be the case, maybe. See if you can negotiate with your landlord. More important is to not let your lease expire to a month to month agreement. Remind them ahead of time if need be. Most of the time when a long term lease expires , it goes to a month to month agreement. This rent is usually higher than your original lease.

Try to negotiate @ 4% and see what he/she says. Speaking from a landlords P.O.V. I would rather have a continued tenant than a vacancy, which in some cases can take 1 month to turn the apartment back to rental ready status. After you do the math , the 1 month loss in rent could equal 8% for the year.

See what else is available, there may be something that works better for you out there. Don't let the groove keep you there.
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November 02 2011
 
Related Questions
Is there anyway to fight a rent increase if the landlord forgets to renew on time?
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December 07 2011 | 7 answers
  • Asked by LaurenWestVillage
  • In Landlords
  • November 02 2011
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