Profile picture for user3743662

Need a new roof. Pro's and Con's between a tear-off or recover over exsisting shingles.

Putting home on the market next spring.  Big difference in cost between tear-off and recover shingling.  Looking for information that helps in the decision making process.
  • October 03 2013 - Buena Park
  • 0
    0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Be a Good Neighbor. Be respectful and on-topic. No spam or self-promotion! See our Good Neighbor Policy.

Answers (11)

Profile picture for Blue Nile
Codes used to allow up to 3 roofs; now it only allows 2 before a tear-off.

If you have an older home that originally had shake on nailing strips (not sheathing), the home will need sheathing eventually, and there is a high probability of roofing blowing off due to nails not being in the nailing strips.

You also don't mention the status of the roof.  Is it fairly uniform?  Or lots of breakage and unevenness?  Are the existing shingles still subtle, or are they brittle and easily break?

If you can't get a good installation without stripping, then your decision is already made for you.

If you can do a good installation over existing, and you already have required plywood sheathing, and it is only one layer of roofing, then why waste the money for stripping and disposal?  (Material costs and installation are the same either way if the sheathing is existing).

On the other hand, renting a bin for disposal is typically only a few hundred dollars, and day laborers can strip down to the sheathing in just a couple days...

Don't think that the buyer won't notice how many roofs it has... home inspectors typically look for that.  And you need a building permit either way, and the plan check and building department inspectors will be looking at that issue too.
  • October 07 2013
  • 2Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

I would spring for the tear off roof and good architectural shingles and then be sure your agent points out the benefits of both in the MLS.
Perhaps then you can ask a little more for the home and get it.
  • October 07 2013
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

To my understanding, you can only "recover" a few times and then you have no choice but to tear off and redo the roof. After a few recovers the roof starts to get to heavy.
  • October 05 2013
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Depends on how many layers you have. If you have 1 you can put high quality shingles on and be fine for years. If you ave 2 layers you need to tear off.
  • October 03 2013
  • 1Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for Matt Laricy
Do the tear off. It last longer and is better. You get what you pay for.
  • October 03 2013
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for Andrew Malak
It depends what price range is your house in. If it is in a prestige location than only tear off. If it is not so so, going over is ok. Look also what is the difference in the cost between the two. If $2, 000 or less than total tear down as it will make a quicker sale and save you time and money on the long run. It will sell quicker and nobody will nickel and dime you.
  • October 03 2013
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for SoCal Engr
In my experience, two layers is not uncommon. And, since a decent set of shingles will give you 20-30 years, it shouldn't be a deal-breaker if done well.

However...

If more than two layers, I would be uncomfortable as a buyer. In my mind, that is a about the equivalent of putting in new, but crappy, carpet. It was obviously done to make the sale, but done with more regard for "done cheap" than "done correct". It would lead me down the path of questioning the quality of the shingles themselves, or to look for other "done cheap to sell" fixes that may have been done.

If the new roof is done to address leaks (vice simple "roof is old"), then I'd prefer the additional cost of tear-off, as it'd give more opportunity to correct problems associated to, or causing, the leak.
  • October 03 2013
  • 2Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

If you have only one layer it is common practice to cover and not strip it.
If you plan putting it on the market next year it will show just as well as one layer because it is new.
Most of the loan companies out there require that there is time left on the roof not that it has 2 layers.
I don't even think it would be written up in an inspection report as something bad, because they know it is common practice also to cover one layer.
3 would be a problem but not 2.
-Joseph-

  • October 03 2013
  • 3Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Always tear off and new, Buyers hate to see another layer!
  • October 03 2013
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

I assume you have a house or 2 flat. If the existing roof is just 1 layer then putting a 2nd layer on top is a somewhat common practice. The inspector will point it out, but not a real big deal. If there already are 2 or even 3 layers on the roof then when the inspector points it out he will talk about how the extra weight might affect the joists and the cost to remove and replace as new will be much more. Some buyers might want a credit.
  • October 03 2013
  • 1Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Your biggest fear is that an inspector discovers that you covered rather than removed the old roof. Some buyers might run from that or ask for a price reduction because of it. It is not hard to discover.
  • October 03 2013
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.