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Post-Closing Repairs

Hi,

Closed on a house, have an amended contract regarding repairs, money was not escrowed (I've been reading other posts).

We had an issue with the electrical of the house, we closed quickly (prior to the end of the year) and were promised by the seller that issues regarding installation of a 220 volt plug for the oven would be resolved.  Meaning, they would install a 220 volt plug.

We contacted our electrician after they had not resolved it after two weeks of us having moved in and we were informed it was going to require the installation of a new box and about $750 because there were no circuits left.   We let the seller know this and they sent out an electrician who kind of did a half a$$ job of electrical and actually took out the arch breakers (which are required by code) and re-wired the box so that we no longer have arch breakers and he essentially rigged it to work.

My question is, they did install the 220 volt, but at the cost of taking out the arch breaker and basically making the rest of the wire a bit more hazardous.  I get it, they met the contract to the word, but at the same time, I feel as though they damaged the house in fixing it, or at least the electrical.  Thoughts or advice on follow-up to possibly getting a solution to this through the sellers? 

Even if I took it to small claims, what is the possibility for success? 
  • February 25 2013 - Houston
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Answers (3)

The arc breakers are required on homes built in 2008 and after.  None of the older homes have them.

I don't think your situation is hazardous but get a licensed electrician to confirm that to you since I am not one.

Naima
  • February 25 2013
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Honestly, it does not sound like you have a very high possibility for success. You should never have moved in or closed on the house without everything completely satisfied in the contract. Depending on the contract, there is a strong chance that you agreed to mediate, but I would have to see the contract. Hopefully, your Realtor can assist you. Right now, you are in need of legal advice and probably need to seek out a real estate attorney. Best of luck! 
  • February 25 2013
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I would suggest contacting a trusted electrician or home inspector in your area with your questions and possibly have them come out to do a follow up inspection.  Being that I am not an electrician, my answer should be taken with a grain of salt.  In our area, homes that are built today (and for the last few years) are required to have arc fault breakers serving rooms that are classified as bedrooms as an additional safety precaution.  Depending on the code for your area and the time of your home's original construction, the electrician may have done something where your home no longer meets code.  In addition, the arc fault breakers are pretty pricy so I'm wondering if he left those behind or if he's installed them at another job and charged them to the next client.
Are you certain that the person who did the repairs is a licensed electrician?  If so, your recourse might fall back on the contractor...they have a license to protect and doing work that doesn't meet code could jepordize the license.
  • February 25 2013
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