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Purchasing a distressed home in Chicago as a first time home a good idea??

I see all the sub 20k prices of Chicago homes and i'm thinking about picking up a foreclosure or short sale.  I'm 30 and this would be my first home purchase and i'm thinking on an investment and live in situation for the long haul...not a quick flip.  I would like to buy cash since my income hasn't been stable for the last 3 years to get a mortgage.  Auction i likely will get priced out so REO or short sale best. 

I want to find something in the 10k range and rehab but don't want to spend 20k and years of work on that.  I know my neighborhood options aren't the best but i'm banking on future development in the west Humboldt park or east Garfield park areas.  Single family home preferred but while also consider condo near UofC..though association fees are a drag i hear.  Any other neighborhood ideas?  Will i be able to find stable renters?  How much of a finical gamble would i be talking? 

thanks
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March 02 2013 - Chicago
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Answers (28)

Profile picture for Pasadenan
By the way, on that door lock issue, many dealers "recommend" a programming patch to the computer, at a cost of $200, which does nothing at all to address the lock actuator that needs lubrication.  Some even recommend replacing the computer controller at a cost of over $500.

Just because someone is in a "professional business" that charges for services, doesn't mean that one necessarily gets good workmanship or even relevant information.
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March 06 2013
Profile picture for Pasadenan
I don't post on Trulia, and never have, and never have any intent to do so.  That site only exists for sales agents to give marking propaganda and spam to other sales agents.

As for posting for obtaining construction "suggestions"?  Yes, I've done so on Zillow.  You can look them up.  Zillow keeps a record of all posts that are not deleted for each profile.  One that specifically comes to mind is a plaster ceiling repair.  A contractor suggested plaster washers.  The repair came out quite nicely and is still in good condition with no signs of any cracks nor patching.  I posted a photo of the finished repair.  You can see it if you look up the thread.

I've also used the "help" sites for automotive repair many times, as well as using the internet "search" tools for such things.  For door locks on one vehicle, I found out that removing a fuse labeled IOD for 30 seconds, and putting it back in usually resolves the issue.  (There is no fuse labeled "door locks", and the on board computer shuts down the door lock-unlock function when there is a small over-current draw on one of the locks).  I also found on the internet instructions on replacing the defective lock actuator, and have since determined which of the locks is specifically causing the problems.  I will eventually pull the actuator for service or replacement, but in the meantime, I have a simple work-around solution provided by threads like this.

As for replacing the foundation?  I consulted with several structural engineers and bolting companies before I settled on a method to use and applying for the building permit.  Many of the people posting on this site (that are not "sales" people) have equivalent qualifications.  It is not hard to sort out the propaganda from useful information.
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March 06 2013
Oooh, you lifted a house. I'm actually glad to hear that, because I do worry that you don't get out enough.

As far as people like our OP go, I do not advise people to get in over their heads. One sign of getting in over your head is that you start asking random strangers if what you're doing is a good idea. Look at a lot of the posts here and on T - what color should I paint (you shouldn't, you should hire a consultant), should I invest (no, you should partner with someone) - this is because when people know what they're doing, they only ask people they know and trust for advice. Pas - back to you, pal - were you posting on T, "What kind of things to do I have to know before jacking up my house?" No. If you had any questions, who would you turn to?

An expert that you know and trust.

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March 06 2013
Profile picture for Pasadenan
So, now the question is why the original poster has not come back to clarify any of the issues, and whether the original poster received any answers that gave any insight as to how to evaluate their "next steps" and decision making process?
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March 06 2013
Profile picture for Pasadenan
Mack, you are the one that "does not know what you are talking about", and you have been consistent on that on all the threads that you participate in on this website.  You continue to make it clear that you don't comprehend common American English.  Your state license is "sales", and nothing else.  I have a state license, and it is NOT in "sales", and I have substantially more experience in the subject than you do.  Just as a very small example,  I have personally lifted my house by hand and replaced the foundation, with building permit.  I just did a cost estimate for an ADA compliant bathroom addition 3 days ago...  the building permit was obtained for it last week.
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March 06 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..
This "discussion" didn't turn from anything into anything
It's just the same ol yadda based on people saying or suggesting others said /suggested something they never suggested or said
"Groundlings" lol

Anyway thanks for sharing the shared,,was interesting for a short moment

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March 06 2013
I meant that the other 'way 'round, "I like how this has turned from the groundlings calling out, "Don't tell them not to buy!" with the real estate community saying, "Don't Buy!" Funny."

Pas, you don't know what you're taking about here, leave it alone. Seattle is home to many truly fine craftsmen (and women). 


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March 06 2013
Profile picture for Pasadenan
If your so called 4th generation professional wood workers were the ones adding those bathroom additions, then they would be $130k kitchen additions for $3k instead.

Cabinet and furniture maker trades is entirely different than standard building construction and finishing.

No, I'm not at liberty to show you the building permits nor finished construction.

We had some really good craftsman wood workers in the 1900's and 1910's but most of them have died off, and most of them didn't pass on their skills to future generations.  Yes I know some really good cabinet makers and finish carpenters, but they mostly rely on their power tools, and they are very skilled with their power tools.

And what does running a mill have to do with building construction and maintenance?  Almost nothing.  That is like stating a trash truck driver is a virtuoso violin player.

I've probably personally installed more shingle roofs than you have even seen installed.
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March 06 2013
- but an average semi-skilled "handiman" owner-builder in this neighborhood constructs better than that $20k Seattle bathroom complete with permits and labor for under $5k.

Yeah, right.

Stick to what you know, Pas. Seattle is home to fourth-generation woodworkers whose ancestors manned the largest shingle mills on the planet.

- The question is really not about "professional investment", but the easiest low cost way for a young person to get into a home of their own without debt.

And lose that stake, too.

- The question is really not about "professional investment", but the easiest low cost way for a young person to get into a home of their own without debt.

I'd rather see a young person five years from now with $10,000 that sat on the sidelines than see them underwater on a project.

I like how this has turned from the real estate community saying, "Don't Buy!" and you saying, "Don't tell them not to buy!" Funny.



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March 06 2013
Profile picture for Pasadenan
"If it were a good idea, real investors would be all over it" -

Professional real estate investors don't want to bother doing the "manual labor" and "living in a construction zone".  There are opportunities for the young skilled energetic construction workers that "love" working with their hands, seeing projects progress, and living with construction.

The question is really not about "professional investment", but the easiest low cost way for a young person to get into a home of their own without debt.

As for location?  That really depends on work opportunities, family, friends, climate, and desires.  If it was just about getting a home that wasn't in a ghetto for under $20k, they would just move to Mississippi, or maybe even to Mexico.

As for "appreciation", and economic changes from sweat equity, that really depends on location, skills, and how well one selects what they decide to work on.

I fully understand that there are some people that believe they are not qualified to do anything besides "sales".  But there are many people in the country and in the world that are qualified to do thousands of different things, especially if it is one of their "hobbies" and their "passion".

As for the $20k bathroom addition?  Yes, people less than 3 miles from here spend $80k on a typical bathroom addition, but an average semi-skilled "handiman" owner-builder in this neighborhood constructs better than that $20k Seattle bathroom complete with permits and labor for under $5k.

We still don't know the experience nor skill level of the Original Poster, and it has not been presented.
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March 05 2013
No, there's no way this is a good idea.

If it were a good idea, real investors would be all over it. You don't really think that all the good stuff hasn't been picked over, do you?

But my point is this: if you're not a pro, don't try to play where to pros play. U522 here, doesn't know what s/he's doing, which is fine - and that's why they shouldn't get in the game. Because the people who know what they're doing have left this "opportunity" in the cull pile.

If you don't know what you're doing, my advice is: don't do it. I don't know how to fly a plane, I'm not going to go to a blog and ask how to make the wingy things fly.

When I meet with "investors," I qualify them - what do you know, what can you do, can you handle this type of property.

Oh, by the way: $20,000? It's a lot of money, and people in Seattle spend that on a modest bathroom remodel. They're the people who can afford to lose $20,000. Not User552x.
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March 05 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..
Don't think anyone is criminally encouraging the OP to invest in distressed properties...just see a lot of people saying there is more to it than......
You need to consider this/that/can you/will you if this is what you are going to pursue is what I see in mine and other posts
"Could be a good idea..could be a disaster"

"Speculating"...
Buy, bottom, housing market recovery, bad times are over ;)

$20,000..don't know anyone who doesn't think that's a LOT of money, at least not anyone who's opinion I care about
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March 05 2013
- Here's my thought. If you (a person) don't know what you're doing then asking others what they think is one of the steps you could take in determining if you should or shouldn't be doing something

It would be a crime to encourage user552x to invest in distressed properties. This is not a playground for beginners or people without a lot of money to burn. 552 has said that they don't want to spend $20,000 on work; when $20,000 is a LOT of money to you, you really shouldn't be speculating in real estate.


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March 05 2013
Profile picture for Pasadenan
By the way... the concept "i'm banking on future development in..." usually doesn't work out the way people expect... development gets delayed for all kinds of reasons, and even with development, it doesn't necessarily change the economics of an area very quickly.  In some cases, if HUD funding is involved, it dooms it to "subsidized income" property for decades.  (We have several of those "community redevelopment" areas and "projects" in this area, and it never removed any "blight", it just forced long time owners out of the city through eminent domain).

The freeway that was supposed to go through Alhambra to Pasadena has been block for over 50 years, and there are still arguments about it, and it is still being blocked.

Over 60 years ago, the city promised a "lake" with "boating" where a flood control dam exists...  it never happened, it kept being promised, and discussed, and now that concept looks pretty dead due to potential environmental impacts, and required CEQA process (California Environmental Quality Act).

Banking on something that has not been "approved" and "funded" yet is usually not a very good idea, especially if you have to deal with neighborhood gangs and drug-dealing and vandalism for decades in between.

If it doesn't pencil out up front, it is probably better to look for other alternatives.  Betting on a high-risk long shot usually means on has a higher probability of substantial loss.

Some people like to put the risk and reward probabilities into a spreadsheet to help calculate the likely return and the potential range of return.
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March 05 2013
Homes in that price range usually have high priced problems.  They might also be condemned by the city.,

I'd also find out if you are required to use city licensed contractors to do your repair work.  In my area the city requires only "city approved" contractors doing the work.  That runs your costs up.

Taking on a major project like this is not recommended for the inexperienced.
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March 05 2013
Profile picture for user7336353
In my point of view it is the best idea to purchase home in Chicago. it is an investment for your future.[hotlink deleted by Zillow moderator. Please see our Good Neighbor Policy for posting guidelines] in chicago are best way to purchase home.
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March 05 2013
Profile picture for Pasadenan
Here's my thought...
even if one is an "expert" at what one does, it never hurts to ask for a second or 54th opinion.

And everyone "starts" getting experience someplace.

What is not clear in the original post:
"live in for the long haul"
verses
"will I be able to find stable renters?"...
So which is it, owner occupied, or renter occupied.
or renter occupied for several years
then rent it out after moving out of town due to work changes?

College students are not "stable renters", but there will always be college students to occupy rentals in a college neighborhood.

How much of a financial gamble depends entirely on:
1) How much differed maintenance needs to be done
2) skill level of new owner.

And that is the missing piece of the puzzle... how much construction and maintenance experience did one gain in 30 years?  I know many that had more experience than a licensed contractor by that time.

And if a "foreclosure"... the lender doesn't need to disclose what they don't know, such as it having been used as a meth-lab.  If one gets stuck with a substantially contaminated property, they can't sell it at all, as they would have to disclose the known condition.  And such "clean up" may never be complete, and the required mitigation could cost substantially more than the property is worth.

If buying an REO, you really need an experienced thorough home inspector.

So, if one's income is "not stable", is there enough cash flow for the maintenance and rehab costs, assuming the new owner has the time and the skills?

And can the new owner get an occupancy permit if there is substantial differed maintenance, or would the person have to fix it before they could move in?

If one has cash to purchase outright, and a present place to live, then perhaps there also are resources for doing the maintenance and rehab?

Only the original poster can know for sure what their skill level and resources are.
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March 05 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..
Here's my thought. If you (a person) don't know what you're doing then asking others what they think is one of the steps you could take in determining if you should or shouldn't be doing something...

Think it's possible the ask if you don't know thing even has something to do with the theoretical need for Ask Us RE Forums

Of course knowing what I'm doing isn't one of my strong points

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March 05 2013
Here's my thought. If you know what you're doing (Dunes), then you don't have to go asking strangers what they think. If you don't know what you're doing, then . . . you probably shouldn't be doing it.
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March 04 2013
It is a great idea for some people and a bad idea for others.
It is a big responibility and lots of potential costs and work, especially a 10K repo. Learn as much as you can and discuss it with some experienced owner/investors and friends who will be helping you do the work..
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March 04 2013
I think with the questions your asking and the way you are phrasing this, it would be a bad idea. There is much more to buying a property than just taking a risk on the actual house. You have to worrry about overhead, renovations, vacancy factors, etc.
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March 03 2013
I am not sure you can find anything in those areas for just 10K, maybe 20K, and if you could you would need to spend 20k+ to make it liveable I would guess.There are other neigborhoods where you might find this price point yet you do not seem to know anything about neighborhoods. Most people do not buy in areas they are not familiar with. They usually rent first. Perhaps find some friends/family/coworkers to ask and get a better feel for various neighborhoods before taking the plunge.
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March 03 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..
I do not think it's a good idea for anyone who is not questioning it ;)
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March 02 2013
No, it's not a good idea for anyone who is questioning it.

The type of person who buys these has a plan and these fit right into their plan.

All the best,
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March 02 2013
Profile picture for blub blub blub
Make sure that those prices for distressed homes are below current market value and not the going price point for the neighborhood.  You don't want to put money into a property and then be overpriced for the area. 

Some of those distressed areas may not see any kind of a recovery at all.
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March 02 2013
I've seen homes up here in Minnesota where folks bought them for a song, only to discover the cost of necessary work would exceed the restored value of the home. Which is why the same houses end up being foreclosed on multiple times in a short time period.

If you can find a 10k home, it's either in an extremely distressed area, or requires far more than 20k in repairs. Many repairs require licensed tradespersons - so no DYI repairs on plumbing, electrical, etc.
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March 02 2013
Profile picture for Dunes ..
Could be a good idea..could be a disaster
If you invest/spend less money then you will need to invest/spend more time...That's just a fact, a dose of reality

You'll be living the Time is money cliche, proving it is true in your case if spent wisely.
Time learning your Market, looking, paying attention to development plans, meetings, knowing the neighborhoods, schools, budget outlooks, properties selling, not selling, prices dropping, rising, learning as much as possible about the buying process/options...
Then there is fixing up..What can ya do, how much time ya got to do it...will ya do it, costs, inspections (What problems? Roof, sewer, plumbing, foundation, paint, dry-rot, mold?), permits and more

It's possible, it can be done, has been done..just need to be honest with yourself about..Time/Commitment

I wish you the best of luck and success if you move forward
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March 02 2013
Profile picture for wetdawgs
How are your handyman skills?   Many of the properties in the sub $20,000 category have words of warning such as "Dangerous Building List" or "Handyman special".   This often means you can't live there while rehabing.  Find a good buyer's agent to get a better sense of what is really available.

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March 02 2013
 
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