Putting your yard “to bed” in the fall means less work next spring

Taking good care of your lawn at the end of the season makes good sense

Our lawns and landscaping have taken a beating this summer. Extended high temperatures and no rain have done us no favors. Landscape designer Jeanne Baker has some tips for you to look ahead to next spring's renewal.

While it may not be as rewarding up front as planting new spring flowers, getting your lawn and gardens ready for winter will be a real time saver come next year. Here are some tips to help you organize a fall cleanup.

  • Dead-head perennials. Remove spent annuals after the first frost, but resist the urge to prune perennials to the ground as this can invite insects and fungal infections.
  • Dig tender plants such as canna lily, dahlia and annual geraniums right after the first frost. Air dry plants and store in a cool dry location for the winter.
  • Don't forget to water trees and shrubs, especially evergreens. The general rule is one inch of water per week. So check your rain gauge.
  • If you are planning on reseeding or over seeding your lawn be sure to do it by mid-October.
  • Cool season grasses benefit from fall applications of fertilizer.  Cool season grasses include bluegrass, fescue and rye grass.
  • Broadleaf herbicides can be applied now to control cool season weeds.
  • For those who garden organically and shy away from herbicides and petroleum based fertilizers, a lush lawn is attainable. Organic fertilizers are available. Bradfield Organics, a local company, produces organic fertilizers specifically designed for lawns. If you choose an organic use a 3-1-5 fertilizer in the fall.
  • Rake your lawn to help keep it healthy. Your grass can actually be smothered when covered by a deep layer of leaves.

Both you and your landscaping will feel much better next year.

  • September 30 2011 - US
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Answers (3)

Profile picture for wetdawgs
Welcome to Zillow Grant.   If you wish to cut and paste an article into the advice section, please be aware of copyright law and at least provide a source and attribute the original author.  For pasting the entire article you need permission from the copyright holder.

  • September 30 2011
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It looks like we all have our work laid out for us in the upcoming weeks.
Nice yards can really make your home more enjoyable and valuable.
It may inspire the neighbors to do more, then their neighbors, then the entire subdivision. It all starts with a little enjoyable outside work.
Have fun.
  • September 30 2011
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Thanks for all the good advise!
  • September 30 2011
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