Profile picture for rbsundin

Radon found in house, how does this affect resale.

I am about to purchase a house that has radon in it, but is supposed to be mitigated prior to closing.  If the mitigation is effective, how could this impact resale of the house in the future.  Are you allowed to list houses on MLS that have had positive radon tests?  
  • December 12 2011 - Richmond
  • 0
    0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Be a Good Neighbor. Be respectful and on-topic. No spam or self-promotion! See our Good Neighbor Policy.

Answers (9)

The important thing about Radon is that the house has a radon mitigation system installed. My own home tested for radon at a level 13 (anything above 4 the EPA recommends you mitigate) and we put in a mitigation system and no problems! The system takes the gas out of the home and puts it out into the open air. My last home also had a radon mitigation system in it. Didn't bother us, matter of fact I was happy to have it. When we went to sell, the buyer was not very educated about radon so it freaked them out a bit. However, they had a wonderful buyers agent who explained that the system was a good thing. They had the house tested anyway, to make sure the system was working properly and then went on to buy the home. I think it's a good idea to test every couple of years to ensure the system is working properly.Here is an article I wrote on the subject, I hope it helps:http://activerain.com/blogsview/2111702/remove-your-smoke-detectors-unbuckle-your-seat-belt
Good luck!

  • June 04 2012
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

I would certainly recommend a post radon test to ensure the mitigation was successful. I would not expect any issues with resale as long as the system is in working order.  Some may think of it as a positive particularly in the Richmond area where radon can be an issue.

  • December 28 2011
  • 1Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for allll4one
Radon is a byproduct of Uranium in the soil.

 I suppose 'best practice' here would be to determine how radon is at the increased level (how is it entering your home and why?

Also, try to see why radon is any higher in your (almost) brand new home.  


Is your neighbor also selling?
  • December 19 2011
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Because of the area we are in, we see them all the time. If properly explained and with the proper warranty from the installers, they rarely present a problem.

In our new builds we generally make the radion mitigation contractors send the vents up inside a chimney or other interior chase, so that you don't have that "hello, i have radon" pipe running up the exterior. 

Get the customers the proper information and effectively explain how the sub-slab mitigation systems work, and most folks will be fine with it.

Best,
Mike
  • December 13 2011
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for sunnyview
I think it depends on how common radon is in your area. In some areas, homebuyers would pass on a house with radon mitigation because they are not familiar with it sort of like termites. In others areas, it is more common and not having to pay for remediation would be a plus.

Ask your agent what the situation in your area and ask some local residents what they think about it too.
  • December 13 2011
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

The radon mitigation systems with their PVC pipe shooting up the wall and exiting under the roof line used to be a stigma in our area but now buyers are fine with sacrificing some of the attractiveness of the home than their family's health.  I'd certainly have one in my home if the pre-mitigation levels warranted it.  Also, just because the next door neighbor doesn't have a system doesn't mean they don't have elevated levels of radon.

Good Luck
  • December 13 2011
  • 1Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Radon and the mitigation systems are odd now but will be normal soon.  In Clarence they put them in new builds.
  • December 12 2011
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

I agree with Bill, and just to add, in certain parts of Virginia, more than 70% of homes tested come out positive before mitigation, and typically, the mitigation works well.
Jim
  • December 12 2011
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for billkruck
Generally speaking, once the mitigation is installed properly, the problem is gone.  However, you never know what type of stigma a mitigation system may have with a particular future buyer.
In my actual experience, a future buyer will just have the home retested as part of their due diligence.  If the mitigation system is working properly, the home will test within standard threshold and the buyer will be satisfied then continue to closing.
  • December 12 2011
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.