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Should I be worried if a home has had multiple foundataion repairs? Is a lifetime warantee enough to

  • January 10 2013 - Far North
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Answers (6)

As you state....it has had multiple repairs.  I've never seen a repair that lasts a lifetime.   You also have to read the warranty.   Typically they're not a FREE warranty, but you have to pay to have the piers adjusted and there are tolerances they use.   Even the repairs under warranty can be pretty expensive.

People in north Texas buy these homes every day, but that is not to say that you won't have cracks and sheet rock and paint repairs every so often.
  • January 19 2013
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The foundation is the "symptom". What's the root cause. In my neck of the woods, the concern is expansive or poorly compacted soil. That's why there is the lingering concern. Personally, I'd take a pass.
  • January 11 2013
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If you're getting the deal of the century, it might be worth considering.

It's not out of the ordinary for some homes to have multiple work done on them, because usually the work is not done in the same place.

The warranty is usually only for the work that was done, so if another part of the house shifts, it's not covered although it could be that first work that cause it...

This is where choosing the right company is so important.

If you buy it at a great discount, expect to sell it at a great discount too.

Good luck,

Naima
  • January 11 2013
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Absolutely!  Why would you want to buy into a home that has clearly had issues unless you're buying significantly under market value?

And remember, a warranty is only as good as the company offering it...and most of these foundation warranties have enough holes in them to drive a truck through.

Think twice before buying into a seller's problem as you will someday be that seller with the very same problem. 
  • January 11 2013
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Regardless of your feelings, the likelihood is that when you come to sell it, potential buyers will have concerns and you will have to disclose the foundation repairs.

All homes sell at the right price. The question is, is the price low enough to compensate for this issue?
  • January 10 2013
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I suggest that you retain a well qualified home inspecter or, better yet, a structural engineer to inspect the foundation.  A lifetime warantee needs to be transferable and is only good while the company is in business.
  • January 10 2013
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