Size of dog should be irrelevant---is dog a good dog or bad dog is the issue.

  • November 27 2012 - Bethesda
  • 0
    0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Be a Good Neighbor. Be respectful and on-topic. No spam or self-promotion! See our Good Neighbor Policy.

Answers (7)

Size of the dog is a big issue, Just thinkl of it this way, the little 6 lb Yorky pees a 1/4 cup, the bull mastiff pees a quart. which would you rather have in your rental home? 
  • January 03 2013
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Don't also forget that many, many insurance companies have "hot dog list" that they will NOT insure if you own one! Pitbulls, Rottweilers, Dobermans are some of the one's on these lists due to their agressive behavior.

So even if the association allows it - you might not be able to get insurance! Be careful with these large breds of aggressive dogs.
  • December 17 2012
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Most owner associations in FL will specify pet size and number of pets in their rules, and further specify excluded breeds of dogs allowed.
  • December 17 2012
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

We don't evaluate good/bad dog. The decision to allow pets to 100% up to the owner and if they decide to allow dogs, we take into consideration the size of the home to determine the appropriate allowed size/breed of a dog. 

Age is taken into consideration because older dogs tend to be calmer and are better trained in most cases. If the prospective renter is coming from another rental property, we call the previous landlord to evaluate the condition of the property to make sure there isn't any damage caused by the pet. 

Its not a perfect science, but meeting a dog directly doesn't tell the whole story either. In fact, many dogs tend to get excited and jumpy around new people, which may not be their regular nature and therefore would lead me to make in inaccurate assumption. I keep the approval process as consistent and reliable as possible by using the same quantitative measures across the board.

There are many effective ways to measure the possibilities of property damage due to a pet. The process we use happens to work well for us and has satisfied our homeowners and renters throughout the 21 years that we have been in business. 
  • December 12 2012
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for wetdawgs
As an agent, what criteria do  you use to evaluate "good dog" vs "bad dog"?

We use the CGC and references, and insist on meeting the dog in person and seeing the guardians interact with the dog. 
  • December 08 2012
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

As a property manager as well as a Realtor, I run into this situation quite often when people who are interested in a rental call. I'm an owner of a large dog myself and she is a total sweetheart so I know where these callers come from when they explain how well trained their dog is. However, in real estate as well as many other industries, professionals can only rely on quantitative measures such as weight, age, and breed of a dog to make decisions that are in the best interest of the homeowner. Without actually spending a length of time with the dog, a professional has no real assurance as to the behavior of a dog. 

There are many variables in making a decision about pets in rental properties. As a dog lover and an owner of a large dog myself, I find myself torn many times but as a professional, I have to remain a neutral third party. I hope this helps shed some insight!
  • December 08 2012
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

A lot of landlords will allow smaller pets, and not take a chance with larger ones simply because (we will use dogs as a hypothetical example) all things being equal (ie mood, behavior, etc) the larger dog would do a lot more damage than a smaller one to the property.  That and maybe for liability purposes as well--a small dog's bite versus a big dog's bite on the premises.

A lot of owners think their pets are little angels, but aren't quite so to everyone else.

Best wishes from So-cal and good luck

  • November 27 2012
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.