"Two large tree roots seen under the structure"

Experts,
I wrote and offer and Inspection report says "Two large tree roots seen under the structure"..

It is not section 1 work but I think it could be a potential threat to the house if roots grow?
How serious it could be? Should it be a deal breaker? How much would it cost to get rid of those roots?

  • February 20 2012 - Fremont
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Answers (3)

Profile picture for aracz
Hi,

Perhaps you would like to consult with a foundation inspector, structural engineer, and arborist. Some inspections (property inspection often) will even recommend you consult a specialist in some cases. Have you had a property inspection in addition to the termite (Pest) inspection?

Best regards,

Arpad

  • June 19 2012
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Other factors:
1) How close to the surface are they?
2) Is it slab on grade, or "raised" foundation?

If roots are near the surface and it is slab on grade, the roots are likely to crack the concrete, but even there it depends on the thickness of the concrete, the amount of steel in the concrete, and the strength of the concrete.

As mentioned, if the roots are large and the tree is removed, you will have settling as the roots decay.  You can pump with grout, but you almost have to wait for the decay to get the grout to replace the root.

If raised foundation and in one area, you can "bridge" the root, replacing that one section of the foundation.  If raised foundation, there are always ways of re-leveling a house (for a cost).  If slab on grade and a section of the slab raises, that is bit tricker to level.
  • February 20 2012
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Profile picture for sunnyview
You need to find out what type of tree it is and make sure that the foundation is not being undermined. The tree can be cut and the root system can be poisoned, but if the house foundation is dependent on the root to maintain it's current level, you can have settling issues when the roots begin to rot and shrink.

Some trees have aggressive root systems than others. It is not uncommon for roots to be under houses. The question is what kind are they and do they affect the foundation. 
  • February 20 2012
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