Profile picture for jessanne

Vintage Bathroom - Reglaze or Keep?

I own a beautiful Tudor 1920's home in Grand Rapids, MI. The interior of the home has been updated but I am conflicted about how to handle my primary bathroom. The bathroom is almost completely '20s tile which is worn or broken in a few areas. The teal and yellow combination is also not in line with the rest of the house. We have tried to neutralize the effect by bringing in a lot of white accents and new fixtures, but we know that it may not apeal to the masses. I do not know if it is currently a distraction to our house or an asset. We are thinking about reglazing the tile to a more neutral color. Any opinions or past experiences with reglazing would be appreciated.

  • December 23 2008 - John Ball Park
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Answers (11)

Best Answer

Profile picture for TamiVroma
IMHO - I think you should reglaze and make the bath more neutral.  Most people I work with like the charm of the old homes but when it come to the bath and the kitchen, they usually want updated.  The charm is the building itself, the lines, the old wood floors and moldings.  Bathrooms need to be functional and not shocking.  Just my opinion and I wish you much luck!
Blessings!
h
  • December 29 2008
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Profile picture for lucydjacobs

A friend had her 1950s pink bath reglazed, and it looks new. Since you are not selling, this could be a temporary solution.

We had a small full bath retiled floors to tub surround, new toilet, new sink with cabinet, and had the tub reglazed. It cost around $10k. We had our tiles replaced because the hairline crack along a row of tiles on the show wall could eventually take on enough water seeping behind them to lead to mold problems.

  • January 01 2009
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Profile picture for jessanne
I do not think the current market would justify a total bathroom renovation. Grand Rapids, MI is much different from Long Beach, CA. However, I am not against swapping out the tile if it is better in the long term. I am looking for a way to merge newer conveniences with the 1924 house. A designer is completely out of the question.
  • December 31 2008
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Profile picture for jessanne
Tami - that is what I was thinking too - reglazing in another color. I actually just bought the home last year and am not looking to sell it now but I am thinking long term.
  • December 31 2008
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An updated bath is always a good investment. If you were looking to buy would you want outdated plumbing fixtures and out dated broken tile?

Do it right or you won't get the value back.

A 1920's home with a modern bath or kitchen will out sell those stuck in the past, there alot like typewriters, or corded phones. Afterall you use them every day.
  • December 30 2008
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are you sure that is original tile? I sell in historical district in Long Beach Calif and that is looking much more 60's layout... not 20's... typical the wall tile only went to aprox 45" up from the floor... but you could be right.. glazed tile always looks like painted tile.... if you are doing that to freshen up the place ... it will cheapen it not enhance it... save money and re-tile the bath room get some advise from a designer who knows vintage if that is the flavor you wish to retain, or go with what you like... good luck
  • December 28 2008
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Profile picture for jessanne
The bathtub area just looks dark because of the lighting in the picture. The window adds alot of light in the day time. I think the only change we made to the bathroom was the sink. The previous sink intruded into the entry way, but was still white porcelain. The fixtures in the tub area are white 1920s Crane originals.
  • December 27 2008
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Profile picture for WoodyWW
To add to what I said before,&maybe contradict it: All that tile: I appreciate it, but it may be "too much" for modern buyers, even ones who appreciate 1920's Tudors. I also wonder if the bathtub area isn't kind of "dark" & off-putting?

I think there are other options that would fit a 1920's Tudor, other than tile on every square inch. I'd consider removing the tile, & going with a simpler & cleaner look. Also, it looks a lot like the bathroom in "the shining".

Also, There are people who will tell you to never replace anything in your house, no matter how decrepit or failing, lest it "wind up in a landfill".......which kind of rules out a huge %-age of renovations, upgrades, etc.......    
  • December 27 2008
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Profile picture for WoodyWW
IMO the new fixtures don't match the '20s tile bathroom at all. I'd probably have gone with old refurbished fixtures, or new ones to match the original style.

Now you're "betwixt&between". I'd proceed very carefully; maybe even try to get some bath designers in for estimates who know old houses. Some people would kill for that '20s tile bathroom......
  • December 25 2008
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Tudors are very popular with people who are looking for old world charm. I would keep the tile because it will go great in keeping with the era detail. A reglaze and new tint would be great to breathe some new life into it.

Reglazing will also safe money and keep landfills down.
  • December 23 2008
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Profile picture for wetdawgs
Tile lay out that is a bit funky in keeping with the period of the home usually is fine, BUT, if there is a lot of missing grout and/or cracked&broken tiles, I'd reglaze.

Gentle suggestion:  bathroom photos are far more attractive with the toilet seat down.
  • December 23 2008
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