Profile picture for mrogusky

We want to know our property lines. How do we find this info?

Our back neighbor is going to re-fence and we believe she will be covering a easement. The paperwork on our property line has gone missing. We would like to see the official property lines before she begins construction. 
  • September 20 2010 - Bay Park
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Answers (18)

Profile picture for Carole Tyne
may need to get surveyor out if not marked
  • September 03 2014
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In San Diego, we get people renting our metal detectors to find metal markers on their property. I'm told we are very inexpensive compared to other options. I'm not sure if every property has them on all lines but our customers find them. [deleted by Zillow moderator. Please see our Good Neighbor Policy for posting guidelines]
  • September 03 2014
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You can also have a surveyor mark the particilar boundary in question to save money. IF there is an easement - that will appear on your title insurance report - and may be plotted already.  Check there first.  Good luck to you.
  • November 28 2010
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Best way i sto have a full survey or an ILC ...good luck
  • November 28 2010
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Profile picture for Ryan Rygmyr
Asked my husband who went to law school.  The best way to avoid dispute and a legal issue is to get a survey by a licensed surveyor.  There are tons of cases which lawyers argue and law students read about property line disputes.  Fences are expensive to have to dig up and replace.
  • November 15 2010
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do you have a survey on your property?
  • November 02 2010
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1.) Your County Recorder get a copy of your property line.

2.) Have a survey of the property.

number one is the least expensive. number two will cost $$ but both parties will know the lines.
  • November 01 2010
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Profile picture for MoniqueU
Pasadenan,
U soo funny.
  • November 01 2010
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Profile picture for Blue Nile
Before hiring a surveyor, you should look for a surveyor tack in the sidewalk or public right of way.  Often there is one at a corner of a block.  If someone surveyed their property, there may be one or two at the front of their property.

If you have at least one known point along the public right of way, and you have the legal descriptions of the plot, or a good dimensioned plot map, you can measure off where you would expect your property lines to be yourself from the known point.  This would at least tell you if there might be issues where you want to pay to have a surveyor involved.

Fences are rarely right on a property line, so the fences themselves do not establish the property lines.  Under some conditions, they may imply "settler's rights", or "implied easements", so if it really becomes an issue, a lawyer may need to get involved.

For utility easements, (often along the back of the property), the fence can usually be in the easement, but should not be on your side of the property line unless it is "your" fence.  Back property lines are often more difficult to determine, but if you have a straight line of sight and a clear front property line due to a street right of way, a tape measure may be sufficiently accurate.You also may be able to contact one of the local utilities for information about their easements, and their access requirements.
  • November 01 2010
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Profile picture for sunnyview
Going to the tax assessor's office for info is a great idea. They should be able to give you a plat map and legal description of your property. A local title company could also get you that information.

The maps alone may not help you determine the legal lot line without a survey of some type. Some survey companies will do a low cost preliminary survey. You can also see if you can locate the property line posts with a metal detector. Many times lots are marked at the corners with a metal stake pounded into the ground. If you can find these markers, you can stake out your lot before construction begins and avoid problems with your neighbor.
  • September 21 2010
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Hello,
Your best and quickest bet may be to just head over to the County Tax Assessor (9225 Clairemont Mesa Blvd, San Diego, CA‎ - (858) 505-6262‎) and see if they have a map of the property lines or you can always contact your title company for the plot map. Also, I personally have worked with surveyors in the past and if you chose to go that route it will solidify any question that you might have regarding your property lines.
Holly Bell
  • September 21 2010
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Profile picture for Asa Lennon
Great advice the title company should have a copy of the survey.Some counties keep them on reocrd and its a simple matter of going there (Call first to see). The attornies from the last transaction should also have a copy unless you're in a state that doesn't use them..The bank may also have a copy..If all that fails..you can always order a new survey.. With the sslower market, surveyors might compete price wise to have a new one done..the best idea!!!
  • September 21 2010
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You can call your title company ( yes , you have one ).  when you closed your home you paid for title insurance.  They should be able to proivde you with a new property profile that would have plot map, easements of record etc.  If you go back to your title company - this should be free for you. 

If you don't know who they are or can't remember then I would call Philip Waterman of California Title and ask for his services ( 818 371 8212 ).  Going through Philip may be a pay service however you will get the info needed within 24 hours.

You may need to hire a surveyor depending on the information you find in the report.  I would caution you from hiring a city surveyor as that could bring you additional headache for any issues you have with your property ( known or unknown ) 

Reuben Pacheco

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  • September 21 2010
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I would check with your title insurance and probably hire a surveyor to check them so you can be sure.As an agent, I have been through this several times. This is a matter you want to be 110% right! Best of luck!
  • September 20 2010
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Contact the company that holds the title insurance on the property. They have an interest if a fence is going to be installed over your property line or on a easement.  They can also come out and conduct a survey if they feel that the lot is being encroached upon. Get them involved.  If you aren't sure which company it is, contact the real estate agent you purchased the home through.
 
Good luck!
Lauren Lombardi

  • September 20 2010
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The city may have plot plans, but a survey is a good idea in this instance. If your neighbors don't want to pay to have a survey done, it would be a good idea for you to have one before the fence goes up.
  • September 20 2010
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If you are in a newer community then the builder has a plot plan. If you are in an older community go to your city or county planning office and they should have all the plot plans for every community. You may also tell your neighbor to make sure they get a survey incase they intrude over their line and have to move the entire fence later. Ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure.
  • September 20 2010
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You may have to contact a surveyor but you may find the info you need through your town or city records. Call you town hall tell them your problem and see if they can help. Good luck
  • September 20 2010
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