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What are the steps to split multiple parcels from a single deed?

  • March 22 2009 - Topanga
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Answers (2)

Hi there,

I am an agent who specializes in Topanga Canyon, Malibu, and surrounding areas.

I would contact a local land use consultant.  They'll be able to point you in the right direction.  I have a list of local consultants and state, county, and city agencies that you might find useful on my website at:  www.TeresaHames.com/land

Good Luck with your your project!

- Teresa Hames
  • March 26 2009
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Profile picture for Jon Petersen
it depends on where you are at and how many you want to split to. In California, it is a long process(1-2 years) and you would pay out at least 30-50k just to split it in two. You would have to hire a civil engineer or land surveyor, and they would have to prepare a tentative map, get it approved, be given conditions by the county or city, and then do final engineering (final parcel map, and depending on how many lots, grading plan, street plans, water and sewer plans, and storm drain plans.

But I have heard there are places in the midwest where you walk in to city hall or the county building, and tell them where you want to divide it, and they do it over the counter.

The best bet to find out your local area requirements are to contact a local engineer or surveyor, or go to the county or city bulding.
  • March 22 2009
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