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What do I need to know about air ducts & their materials for me to make a informed decision about ch

[Here is the original question since I can't edit the question/subject that was cut off without warning:] What do I need to know about air ducts & their materials for me to make a informed decision about choosing a contractor for possible duct replacement?

Some background: I am buying a 25 year old home that has entirely flexible ducting, most of which has lost its first or second layers based on the assessment & pictures from a home inspector as well as an HVAC contractor.  Also, there is one duct line that is significantly bent or crumpled.  So duct replacement was recommended by the contractor and they claimed that the inside of flexible ducting cannot be "cleaned".  Is that true?
  • December 29 2011 - Phoenix
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Answers (3)

Best Answer

Dan, the OP is posting in Phoenix, where there aren't too many basements, and the ductwork is usually in the attic (or between floors). If there's moisture in the attic that's another problem altogether!

 I'm assuming the "flexible" ducting could be accordion-like which could make it difficult to clean. But I would definitely go with a second opinion from at least one more licensed HVAC company before replacing all the ductwork. There might be a possibility that the life can be extended with proper repairs rather than replacement. (As everyone knows a little duct tape here and there can fix anything ;-))
  • December 29 2011
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I have always seen metal ductwork used. You can either use galvanized or aluminum. Talking to a heating contractor can give you the pros and cons of all available options. If your basement is moist corrosion is an issue to consider.
  • December 29 2011
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Not sure as to whether that's true, but as with any expensive repair/update, it's recommended to get at least one second opinion / estimate. Home inspectors aren't necessarily licensed or qualified to recommend what needs to be done specifically - they usually identify potential problems and recommend having the issue looked at in depth by a licensed pro. Chances are if the HVAC contractor you hired seconded what your inspector found, they are legit, but still won't hurt to get a second opinion.

Inbox me if you want the name of an HVAC company that I've always found to be honest and fair, without recommended un-needed repairs. They may be able to answer you question regarding flexible ducting on the phone.
  • December 29 2011
  • 1Yes

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