Profile picture for user083536

What to do if I suspect my landlord entering my home when I am not there?

My landord lives on the property and has only four units. His clear view of parking allows him to protect his property which he does with a very close eye. He has entered my neighbor's home without consent to fix something and I was suspicious back when I first moved here. I always know when he does enter my home because of the way I lock up. Recently, I came home unexpectedly and he was forced to quickly exit the back door leaving it unlocked and running right into me at the front door. I am not sure what to do because if I bring it up to him I fear I will be picked on(he does bully occasionally)and I can't afford to move. 
  • September 28 2012 - Phoenix
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Answers (6)

Profile picture for sunnyview
You need proof that he is entering without your consent and you need to document this incident in writing in a casual way. Send him an email or a note in the mail with a "proof of mailing certificate" telling him that you were stunned to see him inside your unit that day without getting any notice. Casually outline what happened in a non accusatory way and ask him to kindly give you notice when he plans to go into your unit.

Then, get yourself a motion activated cam or a nanny cam set to record. If he enters to the unit again without notice, you may have a case for "constructive eviction". In many states, landlords who force a tenant to move by failing to do repairs or entering the unit repeatedly without notice have to pay for you to move and are subject to paying damages on top of that.

Document things in writing, stay calm, get proof of his entry and then if you have to move it will likely be on the landlord's dime and not yours.
  • September 28 2012
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in california a landlord can enter the property if it is an emergency. other than that he has to give you a 24 hour notice. if you think he is coming in without your consent find out from your local police what your options are.but you will have to prove it. how? set up a nanny cam. there you will have the proof for the police. as a tenant you have the right to quiet and peacefull enjoyment of your home. just cause he is the landlord,, does not mean you have to allow for your personal space to be violated. if you change the locks, then you will be in violation of the lease.
  • September 28 2012
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Profile picture for selling next year
In a 'Landlords' market you have to put up with this crap......
Sure, you could start a war, but then what?
  • September 28 2012
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Profile picture for AmandaMack1
There should also be locks in place that can be only opened from the inside so that when you are home you can lock the door when you are home and he can not come in (this will make the home secure while you are home). If you have a gararge you can can also have the house secure because you can lock all the door and then go out through the gararge.

I also agree that a police report should be filed. The landlord can not just enter your home without notice.
  • September 28 2012
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Profile picture for Outer Banks N C
Doing something could make life there more difficult, so it is up to you how much you wish to get into this. A call to police and them paying the landlord a visit could be all that is needed. Changing the locks is an option but that might be a violation of the lease, maybe remove them and give them to the landlord and say, "Rather than changing these I replaced them and will replace them when I move out, if you need to get in for maintenance I will meet you here". Something like that. Good luck

Tim
  • September 28 2012
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One thing you can do is install a small camera that monators the door. In most states the landlord needs to give the tenant proper notice to enter the property usuall 48 hours. The landlord can enter anytime if it is an emergency. I would keep my eyes out for another place to live. If he does enter and you have it on tape, you can use it to get out of your lease( if you need to). I hope it helps you. Also if you are on good terms eith the other tenants, make them aware of your concerns.
  • September 28 2012
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