Profile picture for user7946023

Where might I find good information on the cost effectiveness of piering a foundation?

Exploring purchasing a house that has extensive ( $12000) foundation settling problem.  Excellent value in the home at the asking price but very concerned about piering adding or reducing the value of the house.

  • January 29 2013 - US
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Answers (2)

Profile picture for nwhome.us
Two engineers usually work on pilings or piers; a soils engineer and a structural engineer. The latter gets numbers on the soil from the first and then describes what it will take to support the structure that the system is carrying.

I'd look into pipe piles as they are typically very cost effective. It is a very effective, fundamental technology. Look for piling contractors and ask if they do them.

I love homes that involve engineers working specifically on the site and home.  It distinguishes the home from most of homes that are built. It's backed by the engineer's stamp.
  • January 29 2013
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Profile picture for sunnyview
Some people feel that it does not subtract value upon resale while others feel that a house with foundation issues is likely to have more of them in the future.

Before you jump on this house, I would get answers about what caused the issue in the first place. I considered buying a house with foundation issues that was not that old about 25 years. They were caused by problematic expansive soils and poor site preparation when the house was built. Upon further inspection, I found that the foundation had to be repaired twice in the last 10 years. I passed on that house even with a "lifetime warranty".

On another house, there were foundation issues, but the house was 50+ years old and the problem was coming from a gutter issue that has caused localized drainage problems around the foundation. House was well built and just had a case of neglectful maintenance. I made an offer but was outbid.

Foundation issues can be common in some areas, but if they are not common in your area they may affect the value when you go to sell.
  • January 29 2013
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