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Why consider a sunroom?

In many cases, a sunroom becomes everyone's favorite room in the house. This is simply because sunroom are a wonderful way to relax and entertain family and friends with the feeling of being outdoors except you don't have to worry about bugs, insects, wind, rain, cold temperatures and other nuances.

 

Structurally, you should consider an aluminum sunroom which will allow you to maximize glass and minimize maintenance. Other materials, such as fiberglass and vinyl do not have the same structural integrity as aluminum. Fiberglass and vinyl are not used in commercial construction due to commercial codes. Vinyl and fiberglass have no base line and therefore lack in structural integrity.

  • December 02 2010 - US
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The value added for a sunroom addition is not so black and white.

If a househunter is looking at a home where the house is completely updated, and that is what he/she is looking for, i.e., new kit & bath., and the home has a sunroom addition, the value added for the sunroom could be different than a home where although the home has a new sunroom addition, the kit. and bath are not updated.

When the househunter, who wants a completely updated home, finds that home, and their is a sunroom addition bonus room it can have can have a real WOW facor. 

Although it may be difficult to determine exactly the value added due to the WOW factor, there is no denying that there are certain varialbles, mentioned above, that can change the value added of a sunroom addition.

Incidently, when a sunroom is made of aluminum (make sure it has a thermal break if your in the northeast) you can get to 80% glass.

Most homeowners that have invested in a sunroom have admitted that it is the most used room in their home.

One can get the feeling of being outside without being outside and the elements associted it, such as, bugs, cold, rain, etc., etc..

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  • December 14 2010
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You are right. Different materials must be used in different climate zones. In the Northeast using a 6" 2 Lbs. density expanded polystyrene with 4" insulated walls and a 6" sip (structural insulated panel) for the floor, is recommended. Since most of the walls are glass, finding a double pane, low e, laminated glass is essential. Look for glass with a low u-value.

In most states, if you do not install an internal heating system into the sunroom, you will not be taxed as heated living space. One can install a heat pump or plug-in electric radiant heaters (Lowes), and not be taxed as heated living space.

Aluminum sometimes gets a bad rap due to its conductive properties, although it is hard to dispute its strength. Many companies have experimented with fiberglass and vinyl, however due to its flimsiness, it's losing its sizzle. Fiberglass and vinyl is not considered a viable building material as far as structure in commercial application. From an engineering standpoint, there is  no base line. Make sure that the aluminum in the sunroom is thermally broken not only in the walls but also in the windows themselves.

There are some great features that now come standard with some sunroom manufacturers, such as retractable screens and built-in gutter systems.

I hope this information was helpful.

P.S. The reason why one would use aluminum over conventional construction (studs and sheetrock) would be to maximize glass square footage.
  • December 17 2010
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Profile picture for jadedea
cant you make a sunroom with normal building materials like the ones used for building the house?

i love sunrooms and seeing a house have one does update its cool factor but if it isnt a well insulate sunroom then its just a waste of space, especially in extremem weather places like the desert or east coast!
  • December 17 2010
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Sunrooms seem to get hot in the sun and cold in the winter. I see no advantage of paying for such a structure as its apparent energy consumption is to high.

Aluminum is a horrible heat sink. It is not energy efficient even though it is solid material for building with. Glass is not a great insulator either.
  • December 14 2010
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I always liked sun-rooms but I wonder about their value as an investment.

Do you have any published statistics of how much a addition of a sun-room will add to the resale value of a house?

For example if you have a $100k house and spend $15k on a sun-room...what would the house now be worth (statistically speaking)?
  • December 02 2010
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