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buying a resale DR Horton home, has polybutalene pipping, a big concern?

we are buying a 2008 dr horton resale home in palm city,just found out there is polybutalene pipping in the house, is this a serious cncern in light of rhe problems with bp pipping in the 1990s?
  • July 14 2014 - Palm City
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Answers (3)

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Homebuilders and developers have been hanging on to the mineral rights underneath their projects, pushing aside homeowners' interests to set themselves up for financial gain when energy companies come calling. This is happening in regions far beyond the traditional American oil patch, which has a long history of selling subsurface rights.

Among the private firms are Oakwood Homes in Colorado, the Groce Companies in North Carolina, Wynne/Jackson in Texas, and Shea Homes, which builds coast to coast. Publicly traded companies that engage in the practice include the Ryland Group, Pulte Homes and Beazer Homes, according to oil and gas attorneys and public land records.

D.R. HORTON (AKA EMERAL HOMES) THE BIGGEST U.S. HOME BUILDER, IS A HEAVY USER OF THE PRACTICE. The Fort Worth, Texas, company has separated the mineral rights from tens of thousands of homes in states where shale plays are either well under way or possible, including North Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Virginia, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona, Oklahoma, Utah, Idaho, Texas, Colorado, Washington and California. In Florida alone, the builder has kept the mineral rights underneath more than 10,000 lots, a review of county property records shows.

In most states, sellers aren't legally required to disclose to home buyers whether they are severing the mineral rights to a property. Builders sometimes flag the move in sales contracts or deeds and other documents they are required to file with local authorities. But buyers don't necessarily review their paperwork very closely, especially if, as real-estate agents say happens often, they don't hire a lawyer to help them with the transaction.

Source:  "Special Report: U.S. builders hoard mineral rights under new homes" (Reuters, Oct 2013)

  • August 17 2014
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 The builder would not be allowed to build with that type of piping as that it is not up to code.heck again with the builder directly or your home inspector can tell you.
  • July 15 2014
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Are you sure there is polybutalene pipes in this home.  I don't believe it has been used in new construction since the 90's.  It may be PVC which is not the same.  
  • July 14 2014
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