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considering a bathroom/kitchen addition - can i use pillons or should i have a foundation/slab

  • October 10 2013 - US
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Answers (3)

You'll need to consult an engineer but my guess is that if you have average soil composition (meaning it's sturdy and doesn't have much "swell" to it) then you might be able to use Spread Footings, which should be the least expensive form of foundation.  You'll need to talk to an engineer about this anyways, as you probably can't get a permit with submitting a plan. 
  • October 18 2013
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This really depends on your existing soils, seismic and structural conditions, as well as what codes are in force in your area.
  • October 18 2013
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Solid foundation is best, but there is still Pier type foundations that are
used in a variety of building things.
There are codes (in certain areas) that govern the size an tec. of the pier pad, and you are also governed by your zones frost level.

It is cheaper to do the piers but if codes are in place and your addition
is around the same size then you may as well do a solid pour.

Some codes say you have to pour a cont. pour per corner 8ft. X 8ft (L shaped) for a one story which is what you are doing with rebar of course.
Two story would be 12 X 12 (L pour) plus centers no longer than 8ft. pulled center to center.

The other alternative is pads which maybe ok in some places and not
ok in others.

We recently purchased a 2 story with piers but plan to do cont. pour for
the additions, I think it would be better.
-Joseph-
  • October 10 2013
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