Profile picture for rprive

does a cell tower lower property value?

Residential neighborhood. In woods
  • November 07 2010 - Town of Bristol
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Answers (5)

Profile picture for wdgarf
While a fair question, it would also be fair to ask if lack of good cellular coverage might also lower property value.  Which would you prefer the least, having a cell tower with good signals or not having one and therefore being substantially unable to use your new mobile device without standing near a window or having to go outside?  Personally, I think the second question is a lot easier to answer because many of us have first hand experience with marginal coverage, and quite frankly, we hate it. 

If we purchase a home in a long-established urban area we can generally be assured of having rock-solid cellular coverage. Unfortunately many new suburbs have zoning or HOA restrictions against the towers solely on the basis of aesthetic concerns without regard to the compelling need for the critical infrastructure necessary to make our high-tech lifestyles possible.  I'm sorry, but you can't have your cake and eat it too. Something's got to give.  The cellular providers are usually willing to meet us halfway and install camouflaged towers disguised as tall (typically 120') pine trees, but in many cases are still struggling with narrow-minded homeowner associations who are absolutely loathe to change their minds.

I would simply like to warn these HOAs that this same attitude is exactly what got their TV and Satellite dish antenna prohibitions overthrown several years ago. If they don't soon relax their restrictions against cell towers, public need for this vital infrastructure will once again raise its ugly head in the Federal courts and the HOAs will lose. 
  • December 28 2013
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I think it would reduce the price of the home but not as much as a busy street. However, in this market, the busy street in a small town are selling for approximately the same value as the residential street.  I believe the smaller towns have been hit harder by the market and price is a big factor.  I think it would reduce the number of buyers who may become interested in the property.  If it is something they feel could affect their health or resale of the home at a later date they may not even look at it.
  • November 10 2010
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Profile picture for Ofe Polack
Maybe yes and maybe no, it depends on the buyer, the location, the price of the home, how far the tower is from the home, etc...Are you buying or selling?
  • November 08 2010
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Profile picture for the_country_hick
Cell phone towers, high power electric lines, railroads nearby, busy streets, interstate near by (noise), cemeteries close by and more are all negative factors. Each of these will drop prices and interest in a property.

If you own the land the cell phone tower is on perhaps it would increase the value as you have an income check coming in. But most people do not want anything they perceive as an objection on or near the house they are trying to buy. If you can see it, hear it, or smell it (or it might be a contamination problem sometime in the future) from your property it is a negative factor and should be avoided if a similar property does not have these problems.

If you do not mind this now consider what happens if you ever wish to sell and the next buyers do object. When buying a property with built in objections you need to consider the long term consequences of buying. In times like this any house with any objection is much harder to sell than a house without those objections. Buyers have choices now and can avoid issues like this easily. In a sellers market it is still a problem but not anywhere near as big a one.
  • November 07 2010
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It depends. There are a few issues. 1. sight issues and if it can be seen from your property. 2. any specific buyers concerns about safety; 3. actual true safety issues; 4. disclosure by you (if it can't be seen).


Some buyers will have concerns about it and not be interested. This could potentially lower your property value. If it hasn't been built, and you think this could be an issue, you can, at the city hearing for the tower, fight it, or maybe try to get it well disguised - like as a tree - and it works pretty well. California cities are good at making carriers hide them.

Many buyers, as long as it can't be seen, won't care. I don't think there has been much, if any, proof that they radio frequency waves are dangerous to humans as long as you are not standing right in front of them within a few feet. Might want to check with the city on what process they went through to determine safety of the site.

The only true way to find out is put your house on the market and see what offers you get!

  • November 07 2010
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