Profile picture for csfaul5150

how many $'s can a landlord raise rent?

  • May 18 2012 - Corvallis
  • 0
    0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Be a Good Neighbor. Be respectful and on-topic. No spam or self-promotion! See our Good Neighbor Policy.

Answers (4)

Profile picture for sunnyview
If you are on a lease, the landlord cannot raise the rent in the middle of it. If you are on a month to month, they must give you the proper legal notice before the new month starts. What does your rental agreement say?
  • May 19 2012
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for wetdawgs
Here's a link to the Oregon Landlord/Tenant resource page.   Here's a link to the section on rent increases. The way I read it, there is no cap on % increase if the landlord follows the timing set out in the link.

  • May 19 2012
  • 1Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for HollyDM715
That depends on several factors.  First, has or will your current lease expire before the rent increase goes into effect? If your lease has not or will not expire before the intended rent increase, then the landlord may not increase the rent.  (This is where it's helpful to remember that your lease can protect you as much as it protects your landlord).  Second, is there any clause or statement in your current lease that addresses when and by how much rent increases can or will occur?  If so, then the landlord is limited by the conditions as stated in the lease.  (This is more common in longer term leases, say 2 to 5 years or more).  Third, are there any state or local laws that govern rent increases when the lease itself doesn't address the issue?  If so, then your landlord is limited by the wording of the law.  Finally, and most importantly, what will the market bear?  If similar units in your area are renting for what your landlord is asking, then the rent increase is probably not unreasonable.
  • May 19 2012
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Whether your landlord can raise your rent depends on whether you have a lease or a rental agreement, and what it says.

Some tenants have leases. If you have a lease, your rent cannot be increased during the term of the lease, unless the lease allows rent increases.

Many tenants have periodic rental agreements – for example, a week-to-week or a month-to-month rental agreement. If you have a periodic rental agreement, your landlord can increase your rent, unless the agreement does not allow rent increases. The landlord must give you proper advance written notice of the rent increase. The written notice tells you how much the increased rent is and when the increase takes effect.

How much advance notice must the landlord give the tenant?

If you have a month-to-month (or shorter) periodic rental agreement, the landlord must give you at least 30 days' advance written notice of a rent increase.

  • The landlord must give you at least 30 days' advance notice if the rent increase is 10 percent (or less) of the rent charged at any time during the 12 months before the rent increase takes effect.
  • The landlord must give you at least 60 days' advance notice if the rent increase is greater than 10 percent of the rent charged at any time during the 12 months before the rent increase takes effect.

This varies from state to state. So you may want to double check with your local Realtor. I hope my information was helpful. Have a great weekend!

 

The amount of notice required depends on the percentage of the rent increase. In order to calculate the percentage of the rent increase, you need to know the lowest rent that your landlord charged you during the preceding 12 months, and the total of the new increase and all other increases during that period.

  • May 18 2012
  • 1Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.