Profile picture for jimtolin

i am trying to determine if a pool is an asset or a liability. I live in zip code 66202

I have the option of filling in an existing in ground pool or doing extensive repairs.  If I so repair it, it will be for resale as I am not able to use it.  Is there any liability issues?
  • May 01 2010 - Overland Park
  • 0
    0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Be a Good Neighbor. Be respectful and on-topic. No spam or self-promotion! See our Good Neighbor Policy.

Answers (5)

Unfortunately, these days, there's ALWAYS liability issues with everything!  I would recommend that you get an estimate on how much it would cost to repair the pool, then give me a call or email me.  I can do some research on your particular neighborhood.  Traditionally, pools do not add a specific dollar value to your property in our neck of the woods (darn winter months!); however, I've had several buyer clients really like that feature - that a house has an inground pool - making them pick that particular home over another one.  It really depends on how much money it will take to repair.  Once you repair it, you will need to make sure you abide by all the safety issues (contact your home owners insurance agent and make sure they have the update on your coverage), and city ordinances dealing with pools (i.e., must have a 5 foot fence, with lock. . .)
  • June 07 2010
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Both Kevin and Bamkmartin - give you great advice.
  • May 03 2010
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for bamkmartin
Leave it as is, then when you sell, offer the buyer a 2k allowance to fill in pool or rehab the pool.  Ask your insurance company about liability issues.
  • May 03 2010
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

Profile picture for scoschro
There are liability issues that can be lessened by having a locking fence around the back yard, or around the pool.

I always tell my clients that it is impossible to know whether a pool is a good thing or a bad thing. It is completely up to the buyer. I have clients to who say "Oh Perfect!! There's a pool!!"  And the very next person to whom I show the house may say "Oh nuts. There's a pool.  How much will cost to fill this in?"

Maybe the best course of action would be to put a pool cover over the pool while the house is on the market.  When a prospective buyer asks about the pool, you can indicate that it needs repairs or should be filled in, depending on the buyer. 

[contact info removed by moderator]
  • May 01 2010
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.

If you do the repairs, you need to make sure that you follow local ordinances and laws regarding your pools safety. You need to make sure that your ducks are in a row as far as fencing and pool safety in keeping neighbor kids out of the pool, or else you could get yourself in trouble if something does go wrong.

  • May 01 2010
  • 0Yes

  • Report a Problem

    Please enter a valid email address.

    Content flagged

    We will review this content. Thanks for helping make the site more useful to everyone. To learn more, read Zillow's Good Neighbor Policy.

    We're sorry. This service is temporarily unavailable. Please come back later and try again.