Profile picture for pineday

what is better to buy a new house or a used house?

  • July 22 2009 - Miami
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Answers (9)

Profile picture for Ofe Polack
It really depends on the condition of the re-sale.  There are sellers that look after their properties very well in which case, oftentimes the re-sale offers certain advantages like established gardens, add-ons and upgrades.
A new home gives you a peace of mind  for a while and oh....there is nothing like the smell of new home. 
Can I assist you in the process of looking for a home?  The best of luck!
  • July 22 2009
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Certain resales are hard to insure, that is a factor.

Is the new one far from where you want to live and work?

What is the price difference? Can you get into a bigger resale for the same price?

How old is the roof?

Are the appliances up to date?

What extras are the builder throwing in?

I suppose you would have to evaluate each house on its own merits.
  • July 22 2009
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Be careful of the chinese drywall issue in some newer homes....
Also get a home inspection regardless of the age of the home - new/old does not matter get it inspected.

All builders are not created equal - how long has the builder been in business - talk to other home owners who bought that builders home - how well is it aging?

Hope this helps
  • July 22 2009
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Advantages to both.  Simply ones preference.  Older homes bring charm and character.  Newer homes are more open and airy.  Both can be beautiful in their own image.
  • July 22 2009
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Profile picture for real estate mike
If you can find what you want used, you should be able to negotiate a better deal than on a brand new property. The answer is, what are you looking for in a home and can you afford what you want new? best of luck.
  • July 22 2009
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Houses are built by man, not by God, so ALL must be professionally inspected to identify their flaws.  There will be flaws.  New(er) homes very much tend to be energy efficient, a huge consideration for now, and especially for the future.  New(er) homes usually have more outlets and circuits to easily accommodate today's long list of electric devices, and cable is usually already in place, too. It is also logical to expect that new appliances will last longer than old appliances. New houses tend to cost a little more than older ones, so if you anticipate moving within the first couple of years, it may be harder to recoup the cost of a new home. In that case, you are likely better of renting.  Ultimately, you have to live in it, so choose the one that suits your lifestyle the best.  Get some advice from your local real estate professional.  www.TheCarolTeam.com
  • July 24 2009
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The type of property, the location, the quality range - all factor in, added to one's own preference

Example:  In parts of Palm Springs, CA,  the homes built in the 50's and 60's (Mid Century Moderns) are architectural gems and quite valuable compared with newer standard tract homes of the past decade. (even though the Mid C Moderns were indeed tract homes then, but they were architecturally unique for the era.)

 Architecturally significant older homes can be gems compared with brand new tract homes of today - and vice-versa - that's when personal preference comes in.

Get yourself a good, local agent/broker who's not bent on just getting a sale, but really listens to what YOU want in a home - then you'll be able to tell if it is a good match, you and your agent, from the first three homes shown to you. If they are just NOT what you want - move on to another agent.

Old or New - what makes you and your family feel like the "structure" can really be "HOME" is of the most importance.
  • July 24 2009
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My hub is a contractor. As many contractors that got pushed out of the business due to cheap, unskilled labor now building homes, the older contractors do NOT like the newer homes. They say they aren't built well anymore. Although my hub loves the homes for their updates, most new or after 1980 built homes he rejects for slanted walls, ect. We ended up buying a home built in 1970, back when the labor force was skilled.

Even with the older homes, if they redid the drywall and updated the home, the chinese poisonous walls can still be there. Our walls are plaster. :-) Aspestos and lead paint is another area of concern on older homes. Did I mention my hub is real picky? I thought we would never find a home that fit HIS standards! lol
  • July 24 2009
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I would have to say it comes down to preference.  Many good points about old homes having better construction but not always the case and depends on when they were built. 
But the BIG advantage to buying a new home right now is that builders NEED to get them off of their books now.  This means many new builders are offering rate buy downs, paying for closing costs, throwing in all sorts of upgrades and I've even heard of some giving vouchers for a new BMW.  Most resales are bank owned at this point so it's hit and miss getting any sort of concessions out of them, some are very willing to bargain and some don't want to hear it.
Good luck out there, hope this helps.
  • August 05 2009
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