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what mortgage rate can I get: good position, not a great credit history

I think I am in somewhat of a unique situation, and I wondered what anyone who knows about this sort of thing could tell me in terms of my options...

I'm 27. I graduated from college 5 years ago and moved abroad to work in hong kong in investment banking. For someone my age, my income is very high (above 200k for past 2 years). I also have some money from family/inheritance (1m-0.5m). I am moving back home to America soon to attend an mba program and I want to buy a house using a mortgage. I'm thinking of buying a house roughly 750k value and getting a mortgage. My only problems are that (1) for stupid reasons related to forgetting to pay cable/internet bills in college I don't have a great credit score, granted its gotten better and there's no blemishes over the last 4 years or so (670 fico or so i think), (2) while I'll be at a top tier mba program and i've worked in banking / have a stellar resume etc., at the time i'll want to buy the home i'll have zero income. Assuming I put down say 40% equity on the home which i could easily do and still have enough money to pay fo the mba etc. with no debt, do you think the mortgage broker will understand my situation and give me the very low type of rate I feel the risk profile of my situation should justify? or do you think they'll say something like "your score is simply to low, and you have no income".... am i going to have to wait till i get out of school and get another high-paying job in PE / banking or am I going to be able to buy straight away given my ability to pay larger amount of equity and my "resume" (i.e. 2 ivy league degrees / top tier investment banking jobs etc.) 

I would not want my parents to co-sign, they might, but i just don't want to ask. 
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August 19 2012 - US
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typically 700 or 720 score for jumbo; can go as low as 620 score on conventional if the LTV is under 80%. 2 years US tax returns required, regardless.
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August 20 2012
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Hi Cindy, thanks for your response. for the 18-24 months until I finished by mba i doubt my investment returns would be enough to pay off the mortgage, could be, but my guess is I'd dip into savings... I think you're right that I'll have to talk directly to a few people to see where they can be flexible. You'd think if I showed enough in savings to pay well past the end of school, that would work theoretically, but with dodd frank and what im guessing are somewhat rigid policies at most banks / mortgage providers it could be tough... I guess another option would be to pay for the house 100% in cash, then take out student loans to finance the MBA +expenses during that time (i might have close to enough cash for both, but i'm guessing i'd be slightly short), then after I'm done with school and start working again take out a mortgage for whatever amount I please on the house and pay off the student loans which would presumably be at a higher rate... but part of the reason I'm so attracted to buying a home at this time is the exceptional mortgage rates I've heard people are getting right now..... 
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August 20 2012
You are going to have to speak directly to some mortgage professionals, and may have to seek some other type of loan officers where you leverage your other investments. The problem is that the Dodd-Frank act is truly prohibitive on loaning people money if they don't have the income to support it for a home. Would you be paying the mortgage with returns on your investments or would you be dipping into your savings each month to pay the payments?
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August 19 2012
 
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