would it be a benefit if you could have a 100% impenetrable entry doors that are customized?

  • October 14 2011 - Falls Church
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Answers (18)

Profile picture for Caveat Emptor
I think that everyone who answered here underestimates the value of a hammer, a jigsaw, a crow bar and some bolt cutters, and of course a bloody lock pic).

yes, maybe an oxy-torch or a block of C-4 would get you in, but I could get in without swat on my tail.
  • January 25 2012
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A far simpler thing that often is done wrong is to install the security plate behind the deadbolt plate in the door jamb. Of the deadbolts I've disassembled, easily 50% did not have the plate installed. It comes with the lock set, and ensures that the deadbolt plate is attached to the door framing, not just the edge of the 3/4 thick jamb. Apparently people dont read the instructions and throw them away.

I also make sure that on all the hinges the middle screw - the one that is lined up better into the door frame - has the longest screw I can put into it without causing hinge binding. Minimum 2 1/2 inch. 
Total cost for both is maybe an extra half hour of labor but the difference in resistance to kicking is tremendous. 

Uncle Paul
Acme Builders
Oakland
  • January 25 2012
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If they're a nice looking and enhance the home then beefier doors can be a good selling feature. I remember touring a home with a few 14' inlayed interior doors, pretty impressive.  

With all the comments below it should suffice to say 1) with enough effort anyone can get into a secured space and 2) locks are really designed to keep honest (or unmotivated) people out.

  • January 25 2012
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Profile picture for blue screen exile


To top lock might do a little bit of good; but if someone kicks it, the screws will just pull straight out of the jamb.

The lower one might be "fun", and can be opened from the inside in less than 2 seconds, but could be a fire hazard for people in the house not familiar with these kinds of simple mazes and those that hadn't memorized it.

but the chain is too small to be of any use from the exterior.  First, a small push will break the chain.  Second, since the chain is exposed when the door is partway open, anyone can reach in and cut it in less than 2 seconds.

Actually from what was already shown on the Hermetix website; the largest issue with door security is not the lock nor the door, but the door frame, jamb, and hinges.  If you frame fails; it doesn't matter how good the door is.
  • October 23 2011
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Profile picture for blue screen exile
"Hmmmm....I could have sworn I'd seen a "thumbs-down" button here somewhere." -

Thumbs down were introduced to Zillow at the same time as thumbs up; approximately summer 2008... but there were so many problems and objections with the thumbs down, they were promptly removed about a month later.


AzRob has the record for most thumbs down.  I came in a close second.
  • October 23 2011
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Profile picture for sunnyview
This door lock looks fun. I read that many burglars have ADHD so that one might really work.
  • October 23 2011
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Profile picture for wetdawgs
Come to think of it, I like to come in my front door.   Therefore, 100% impenetrable would be a serious problem.  Perhaps I should just paint a front door on the siding and forget the door part altogether. I wonder why someone would want to sell a door where no one can come through.  
  • October 23 2011
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Profile picture for BungalowMo

Hmmmm....I could have sworn I'd seen a "thumbs-down" button here somewhere.

  • October 23 2011
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Profile picture for blue screen exile
There was a Hawaii 5-0 episode decades ago, where combination safes were X-ray'ed to "see" the alignment of the combination disks.

Who knows if that might actually work?  Probably would need a bit higher X-ray exposure than most people would be comfortable with; but it was an imaginative idea anyway.

Some people say they can hear or feel when a disc is aligned on a combination lock.  I know that I'm not that sensitive.  I would likely go for the hole in the wall method.

After seeing how the U.S. army or marines just use a M16 to shot out the lock or hinges... especially in multiple places in the Middle East, it is not at all surprising that an Israeli company would want to develop a more secure door that the U.S. military would not just treat like butter to do illegal searches an seizures.
  • October 16 2011
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Profile picture for blue screen exile
Hermetix door, with 3d lock and walk & lock feature, made in Israel...

1) "one touch to open"; thus just core drill a hole in the wall adjacent to the jamb, reach your hand in, and "touch", and the door is open.

2) "combination lock, unique for each person in the household"; just hide a micro security camera with transmitter; copy any combination, memorize, and you can get in any time you want.

3) cam-operated inertia energy stored system with three sets of pairs of  insert and twist deadlock bolts; now, what happens if you freeze it with liquid nitrogen?  Will some of the moving parts crack?  What about freezing the lock dial mechanism?  What about drilling out the combination dial to access the interior locking mechanism?  What about taking a 20 pound sledge to a chisel or prybar placed at the combination dial?
  • October 16 2011
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Profile picture for hpvanc
So if the lock system ever fails with it locked, do you have to remove the entire door assembly from the house, toss it and install a new one?  Impenetrable sounds a bit extreme, unless you are also installing bullet proof glass in inoperable or impenetrable when closed windows, and also using steel plating under all exterior surfaces.
  • October 15 2011
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I ordered three of em on his website.

No charge. Not even for shipping.

What a deal!
  • October 15 2011
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Profile picture for blue screen exile
Someone once tried to sell me a light fixture claiming it was "unbreakable"...  but I had seen a prison cell light fixture be broken when a UPS-man had dropped it from the truck when delivering a sample for "review"...

I told the sales person that if one holds the fixture with a corner of the lens facing downward, and drops it from 3 feet onto a concrete floor, it would break.

The sales person says "absolutely not", it is guaranteed unbreakable... go ahead and drop it because I don't believe you".

So, I dropped it, and it broke...  The sales person was embarrassed and didn't try to sell me anything again.  I guess because it was guaranteed, he just took it back and got another one just like it."

"...Ergo, they fail to anticipate all the potential failure modes."

That is why one is foolish to make such a statement in the first place.  The Titanic is the classic example of such arrogance.  Who would have suspected that no one tested the batch of rivets used for the side panels on the ballast chambers?  The rivets just popped off when put under stress.
  • October 15 2011
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Profile picture for SoCal Engr
@ Pasa...

I tend to find there is no such thing as "fool proof". It's a conundrum, but it's almost impossible for reasonably intelligent persons to think of - much less believe in - solutions that fools come up with. Ergo, they fail to anticipate all the potential failure modes.
  • October 15 2011
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Profile picture for the_country_hick
I have a chain saw. I have oxy-acetylene torches. I have an air hammer ( mini jackhammer basically). I have heavy hammers and tools that can get me through nailed together wood. I have grinders that with the right blades can cut through concrete. Trust me, I can get into anything you have put up for doors. It is just a question of time.

No, impenetrable doors are not a true benefit. They are only an unneeded expense. Tough to break down is one thing, impenetrable is another. If the doors are unable to break open how will you get through them when the locks break and will not work?
  • October 15 2011
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Until you or your tenant has to get out in an emergency or the firefighters can not get in.
  • October 15 2011
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Profile picture for blue screen exile
Are you talking about bank fault doors?

What is the point if you can just go through the windows, the walls, the roof, or the floors?

There is no benefit of such doors if you are not building a bank vault.

Besides, nothing is "fool proof" because fools are so ingenious.

Given enough time and resources, I can get through any door that you claim is impenetrable.  But I still would choose a wall or window first if one couldn't just simply pry the door jamb.

Really, how long does it take to cut a new door opening with a chain saw?
  • October 14 2011
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Profile picture for wetdawgs
I can't imagine such a thing.... but please I hope you aren't thinking of promoting a product.

The Zillow Good Neighbor Policy is worth reading just in case.
  • October 14 2011
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