Beverly Hills Home Where Howard Hughes Crashed Listed for Sale

The Linden Dr. crash site from that fateful day in 1946. SOURCE: AviatorHowardHughes.com

A relatively new listing in Beverly Hills draws attention to the original details of the immaculate Spanish-style home at 805 N. Linden Drive that was designed by renowned Southern California architect Wallace Neff.

That’s probably enough history to draw attention to the 6,246-square-foot home priced for $6.995 million in one of the most famous ZIP codes in the world. It’s got curb appeal galore.

But what about the other history of the home — the part where Howard Hughes so famously crashed his twin-engine, twin-boom, $8 million plane into three houses in Beverly Hills, one of them being 805 N. Linden?

Hard to pass up that fiery bit of aviation drama, especially one that  film director Martin Scorsese so wildly re-enacted in his cinematic homage to Hughes in the movie “The Aviator.”

According to Curbed, which first reported on the Linden Drive listing, the plane sliced through the bedroom and garage before crashing in a fireball and spewing engine parts into surrounding yards.

Details of the crash are contained on Check-Six:

After the crash. SOURCE: StephenMalkus.com

Although it was planned to be only a short 20 minute flight, Hughes amended the plan after take-off to include an aerial tour of the Los Angeles basin to show off his latest aircraft.  After a series of test maneuvers, Hughes begun his return to his factory’s airport in Culver City when the right engine propeller control’s ran out of oil due to an undetected leak. The rear portion of the propeller kicked into a “flat pitch” like indoor ceiling fans and forced one of the sets of blades to cease working

… Next, it hit the house next door at 805 North Linden Drive of actress Rosemary DeCamp (best known for her role as James Cagney’s mother in Yankee Doodle Dandy). It sliced through the bedroom where her and her husband, John Staler, were, and ripped across the couple’s garage rooftop.  Fortunately they both escaped injury.

The house, built in 1926, bears no scars from that fateful day. The Spanish tile floors, dark beams, library, formal dining room and generous lawns give the place a gracious serenity. However, as Curbed noted, there is no garage, it having been taken out during Hughes’ crash landing.