‘Spider-Man’ Star Apartment Makes Debut Appearance on New York Real Estate Market

New York is not lacking for apartments that capture the grandeur of the city that never sleeps or buildings that are themselves symbols of The Big Apple, but there’s something a little extra special about the penthouse triplex where “Spider-Man” villain Green Goblin got to call home.

In fact, it’s been said that in addition to Willem Dafoe, Tobey Maguire and Kirsten Dunst, the other co-star of the “Spider-Man” trilogy was this sky-kissing apartment soaring over the East Side of Manhattan in Tudor City.

Now that famous apartment can serve as center stage for some new action-loving hero, since Penthouse Five in Windsor Tower at 5 Tudor City Place, New York, NY 10017 has hit the market for a compelling $1.595 million.

Listing agent Howard Morrel of Brown Harris Stevens calls the apartment a “once-in-a-lifetime chance to own a very special home that is the epitome of classic New York prewar Tudor style.”

The triplex is defined by soaring 18-foot ceilings and the floor-to-ceiling windows that deliver a knockout view of the New York City skyline, including the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building. The herring bone wood floors are original and there’s an oversized wood-burning fireplace that gives the home timeless charm.

In addition to a dramatic staircase that leads to the second level where there’s a renovated kitchen, the apartment comes with a large master suite, its own laundry area and central air conditioning.

If the apartment’s starring role in “Spider-Man” wasn’t enough drama, then its architectural history should add to the plot. Tudor City is a historic district in Midtown Manhattan developed in the 1920s by Fred F. French and the area’s Tudor style residences reflect that Old World aura: Gargoyles, dragons, and other mythic creatures perch on Tudor City rooftops; tapestries and stained glass adorn the lobbies; and building exteriors feature detailed stonework and inscriptions.

The building has also made cameo appearances in “Scarface,” “The Bourne Ultimatum,” and “Godfather III.”  But while Hollywood made good use of Windsor Tower and Penthouse Five, the apartment is rooted in New York history. The complex was built in 1925 to house the growing middle class as it began opting out of the hub of center city for the outer boroughs of New York. The complex includes restaurants, a hotel, grocery, a gourmet deli, and convenience stores, a hair salon, laundry and dry cleaners.

As Morrel points out, “an afternoon in one of Tudor City’s parks is typically tranquil, far removed from the frenetic pace of the rest of midtown.” Or Hollywood, for that matter.

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